Article on teaching with wikipedia - where to publish?

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Article on teaching with wikipedia - where to publish?

Piotr Konieczny-2
Dear all,

I have just finished my second "teaching with Wikipedia" article. I'd
like to publish it in an established academic journal that, if possible,
supports open content. Unfortunately, I do not have much experience with
this sector of the journals (teaching/education/pedagogy journals), nor
with journal impact magic, and thus I'd very much appreciate your
suggestions where to publish. I have, of course, quickly Google'd few
open content teaching journals, but I admit, selfishly, that entering
the job market, I'd prefer my CV to include, if possible, higher-end
journals...

(In my sociology field, the most respected educational journal,
"Teaching Sociology", is, sadly, not open content...).

If anybody is interested in reading and commenting on my article in
question (tentatively titled "Wikis and Wikipedia as a Teaching Tool:
Five Years Later"), I have made it available on Google Docs (just let me
know and I'll send you a link, and enable commenting for your account).

PS. My old 2007 article (titled, unsurprisingly, "Wikis and Wikipedia as
a Teaching Tool") was published here:
http://www.itdl.org/Journal/Jan_07/article02.htm
I am still content with it for what it was in 2007, but by 2011, it is,
I'll be the first to admit it, rather obsolete.

--
Piotr Konieczny
PhD Candidate
Dept of Sociology
Uni of Pittsburgh

"To be defeated and not submit, is victory; to be victorious and rest on
one's laurels, is defeat." --Józef Pilsudski

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Re: Article on teaching with wikipedia - where to publish?

Chitu Okoli
Hi Piotr,

Your dilemma is one I sympathize with and struggle with myself. The route I am thinking of following myself is the "hybrid journal" format: a traditional paid journal that will enable certain articles open access for a fee.

I looked up Teaching Sociology, and found that they are in the Sage journals family. Sage recently launched a hybrid policy, called "Sage Choice": http://www.sagepub.com/sagechoice.sp. This describes what I'm talking about: if the author pays the bounty to release an article from journal jail, the publisher will gladly go open access--for that article only. Sage's rate is $3,000. Other journal prices I've seen are typically in the $2,000 to $3,000 range per article. This is the fair market price of publishing in a high-quality open access journal (e.g. http://www.plos.org/journals/pubfees.php).

Teaching Sociology is not in the Sage Choice program, but I dare say that if you could raise $3,000 in publishing fees, you could negotiate a special deal with Sage to release an article open access. Of course, I'm only using Teaching Sociology and Sage as examples, since that is the journal you mentioned; I would think that many other publishers would be flexible to negotiate a special arrangement, as long as you pay the bounty. Money talks, after all.

~ Chitu

Piotr Konieczny a écrit :
Dear all,

I have just finished my second "teaching with Wikipedia" article. I'd 
like to publish it in an established academic journal that, if possible, 
supports open content. Unfortunately, I do not have much experience with 
this sector of the journals (teaching/education/pedagogy journals), nor 
with journal impact magic, and thus I'd very much appreciate your 
suggestions where to publish. I have, of course, quickly Google'd few 
open content teaching journals, but I admit, selfishly, that entering 
the job market, I'd prefer my CV to include, if possible, higher-end 
journals...

(In my sociology field, the most respected educational journal, 
"Teaching Sociology", is, sadly, not open content...).

If anybody is interested in reading and commenting on my article in 
question (tentatively titled "Wikis and Wikipedia as a Teaching Tool: 
Five Years Later"), I have made it available on Google Docs (just let me 
know and I'll send you a link, and enable commenting for your account).

PS. My old 2007 article (titled, unsurprisingly, "Wikis and Wikipedia as 
a Teaching Tool") was published here:
http://www.itdl.org/Journal/Jan_07/article02.htm
I am still content with it for what it was in 2007, but by 2011, it is, 
I'll be the first to admit it, rather obsolete.


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Re: Article on teaching with wikipedia - where to publish?

David Goodman-2
I think the two follow, which are basically librarianship journals,
but have a very wide scope, would consider this.  Neither have a
publication fee.

 "First Monday" http://firstmonday.org/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

 "DLib", http://dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html

I unfortunately do not know the editors of either, but they're the two
of highest reputation in my field. I am   however not in  the least
sure that academic sociologists will consider either as very
prestigious.

On Thu, May 19, 2011 at 6:47 PM, Chitu Okoli <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Piotr,
>
> Your dilemma is one I sympathize with and struggle with myself. The route I
> am thinking of following myself is the "hybrid journal" format: a
> traditional paid journal that will enable certain articles open access for a
> fee.
>
> I looked up Teaching Sociology, and found that they are in the Sage journals
> family. Sage recently launched a hybrid policy, called "Sage Choice":
> http://www.sagepub.com/sagechoice.sp. This describes what I'm talking about:
> if the author pays the bounty to release an article from journal jail, the
> publisher will gladly go open access--for that article only. Sage's rate is
> $3,000. Other journal prices I've seen are typically in the $2,000 to $3,000
> range per article. This is the fair market price of publishing in a
> high-quality open access journal (e.g.
> http://www.plos.org/journals/pubfees.php).
>
> Teaching Sociology is not in the Sage Choice program, but I dare say that if
> you could raise $3,000 in publishing fees, you could negotiate a special
> deal with Sage to release an article open access. Of course, I'm only using
> Teaching Sociology and Sage as examples, since that is the journal you
> mentioned; I would think that many other publishers would be flexible to
> negotiate a special arrangement, as long as you pay the bounty. Money talks,
> after all.
>
> ~ Chitu
>
> Piotr Konieczny a écrit :
>
> Dear all,
>
> I have just finished my second "teaching with Wikipedia" article. I'd
> like to publish it in an established academic journal that, if possible,
> supports open content. Unfortunately, I do not have much experience with
> this sector of the journals (teaching/education/pedagogy journals), nor
> with journal impact magic, and thus I'd very much appreciate your
> suggestions where to publish. I have, of course, quickly Google'd few
> open content teaching journals, but I admit, selfishly, that entering
> the job market, I'd prefer my CV to include, if possible, higher-end
> journals...
>
> (In my sociology field, the most respected educational journal,
> "Teaching Sociology", is, sadly, not open content...).
>
> If anybody is interested in reading and commenting on my article in
> question (tentatively titled "Wikis and Wikipedia as a Teaching Tool:
> Five Years Later"), I have made it available on Google Docs (just let me
> know and I'll send you a link, and enable commenting for your account).
>
> PS. My old 2007 article (titled, unsurprisingly, "Wikis and Wikipedia as
> a Teaching Tool") was published here:
> http://www.itdl.org/Journal/Jan_07/article02.htm
> I am still content with it for what it was in 2007, but by 2011, it is,
> I'll be the first to admit it, rather obsolete.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wiki-research-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
>
>



--
David Goodman

DGG at the enWP
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:DGG
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_talk:DGG

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Re: Article on teaching with wikipedia - where to publish?

alain_desilets
Have you thought about publishing it at WikiSym? It's not a journal, but it's an excellent conference.

________________________________________
From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of David Goodman [[hidden email]]
Sent: Thursday, May 19, 2011 7:57 PM
To: Research into Wikimedia content and communities
Subject: Re: [Wiki-research-l] Article on teaching with wikipedia - where to    publish?

I think the two follow, which are basically librarianship journals,
but have a very wide scope, would consider this.  Neither have a
publication fee.

 "First Monday" http://firstmonday.org/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

 "DLib", http://dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html

I unfortunately do not know the editors of either, but they're the two
of highest reputation in my field. I am   however not in  the least
sure that academic sociologists will consider either as very
prestigious.

On Thu, May 19, 2011 at 6:47 PM, Chitu Okoli <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Piotr,
>
> Your dilemma is one I sympathize with and struggle with myself. The route I
> am thinking of following myself is the "hybrid journal" format: a
> traditional paid journal that will enable certain articles open access for a
> fee.
>
> I looked up Teaching Sociology, and found that they are in the Sage journals
> family. Sage recently launched a hybrid policy, called "Sage Choice":
> http://www.sagepub.com/sagechoice.sp. This describes what I'm talking about:
> if the author pays the bounty to release an article from journal jail, the
> publisher will gladly go open access--for that article only. Sage's rate is
> $3,000. Other journal prices I've seen are typically in the $2,000 to $3,000
> range per article. This is the fair market price of publishing in a
> high-quality open access journal (e.g.
> http://www.plos.org/journals/pubfees.php).
>
> Teaching Sociology is not in the Sage Choice program, but I dare say that if
> you could raise $3,000 in publishing fees, you could negotiate a special
> deal with Sage to release an article open access. Of course, I'm only using
> Teaching Sociology and Sage as examples, since that is the journal you
> mentioned; I would think that many other publishers would be flexible to
> negotiate a special arrangement, as long as you pay the bounty. Money talks,
> after all.
>
> ~ Chitu
>
> Piotr Konieczny a écrit :
>
> Dear all,
>
> I have just finished my second "teaching with Wikipedia" article. I'd
> like to publish it in an established academic journal that, if possible,
> supports open content. Unfortunately, I do not have much experience with
> this sector of the journals (teaching/education/pedagogy journals), nor
> with journal impact magic, and thus I'd very much appreciate your
> suggestions where to publish. I have, of course, quickly Google'd few
> open content teaching journals, but I admit, selfishly, that entering
> the job market, I'd prefer my CV to include, if possible, higher-end
> journals...
>
> (In my sociology field, the most respected educational journal,
> "Teaching Sociology", is, sadly, not open content...).
>
> If anybody is interested in reading and commenting on my article in
> question (tentatively titled "Wikis and Wikipedia as a Teaching Tool:
> Five Years Later"), I have made it available on Google Docs (just let me
> know and I'll send you a link, and enable commenting for your account).
>
> PS. My old 2007 article (titled, unsurprisingly, "Wikis and Wikipedia as
> a Teaching Tool") was published here:
> http://www.itdl.org/Journal/Jan_07/article02.htm
> I am still content with it for what it was in 2007, but by 2011, it is,
> I'll be the first to admit it, rather obsolete.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wiki-research-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
>
>



--
David Goodman

DGG at the enWP
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:DGG
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_talk:DGG

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Re: Article on teaching with wikipedia - where to publish?

Sage Ross
In reply to this post by Chitu Okoli
On Thu, May 19, 2011 at 6:47 PM, Chitu Okoli <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Hi Piotr,

> I looked up Teaching Sociology, and found that they are in the Sage journals
> family. Sage recently launched a hybrid policy, called "Sage Choice":
> http://www.sagepub.com/sagechoice.sp. This describes what I'm talking about:
> if the author pays the bounty to release an article from journal jail, the
> publisher will gladly go open access--for that article only. Sage's rate is
> $3,000. Other journal prices I've seen are typically in the $2,000 to $3,000
> range per article. This is the fair market price of publishing in a
> high-quality open access journal (e.g.
> http://www.plos.org/journals/pubfees.php).

I'd say avoid Sage if at all possible.  They are one of the publishers
involved in this craziness:
http://blogs.library.duke.edu/scholcomm/2011/05/13/a-nightmare-scenario-for-higher-education/

Sage is one of the publishers (along with Cambridge and Oxford) suing
a university over copyright infringement and asking for an injunction
that would essentially obliterate fair use at that university.

-Sage (not the publisher!)

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Re: Article on teaching with wikipedia - where to publish?

Sam Katz
I just wanted to say that Sage is the most cooperative publisher when it comes to electronic distribution and ADA accommodation. I like them.

--Sam

On Fri, May 20, 2011 at 9:44 AM, Sage Ross <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Thu, May 19, 2011 at 6:47 PM, Chitu Okoli <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Hi Piotr,

> I looked up Teaching Sociology, and found that they are in the Sage journals
> family. Sage recently launched a hybrid policy, called "Sage Choice":
> http://www.sagepub.com/sagechoice.sp. This describes what I'm talking about:
> if the author pays the bounty to release an article from journal jail, the
> publisher will gladly go open access--for that article only. Sage's rate is
> $3,000. Other journal prices I've seen are typically in the $2,000 to $3,000
> range per article. This is the fair market price of publishing in a
> high-quality open access journal (e.g.
> http://www.plos.org/journals/pubfees.php).

I'd say avoid Sage if at all possible.  They are one of the publishers
involved in this craziness:
http://blogs.library.duke.edu/scholcomm/2011/05/13/a-nightmare-scenario-for-higher-education/

Sage is one of the publishers (along with Cambridge and Oxford) suing
a university over copyright infringement and asking for an injunction
that would essentially obliterate fair use at that university.

-Sage (not the publisher!)

_______________________________________________
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Re: Article on teaching with wikipedia - where to publish?

Piotr Konieczny-2
In reply to this post by alain_desilets
Desilets, Alain wrote:
> Have you thought about publishing it at WikiSym? It's not a journal, but it's an excellent conference.

The paper is in fact based on a workshop I held at WikiSym a while ago:
http://www.wikisym.org/ws2010/Teaching+with+Wikipedia+and+other+Wikimedia+Foundation+wikis

I would present it at 2011, if not for the fact that it is too far. Next
time it is closer to my location, I'll likely to so.


--
Piotr Konieczny

"To be defeated and not submit, is victory; to be victorious and rest on
one's laurels, is defeat." --Józef Pilsudski

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Re: Article on teaching with wikipedia - where to publish?

alain_desilets
Good stuff. Just thought I'd check ;-).

Alain

________________________________________
From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Piotr Konieczny [[hidden email]]
Sent: Friday, May 20, 2011 1:08 PM
To: Research into Wikimedia content and communities
Subject: Re: [Wiki-research-l] Article on teaching with wikipedia - where to    publish?

Desilets, Alain wrote:
> Have you thought about publishing it at WikiSym? It's not a journal, but it's an excellent conference.

The paper is in fact based on a workshop I held at WikiSym a while ago:
http://www.wikisym.org/ws2010/Teaching+with+Wikipedia+and+other+Wikimedia+Foundation+wikis

I would present it at 2011, if not for the fact that it is too far. Next
time it is closer to my location, I'll likely to so.


--
Piotr Konieczny

"To be defeated and not submit, is victory; to be victorious and rest on
one's laurels, is defeat." --Józef Pilsudski

_______________________________________________
Wiki-research-l mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
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