Closed-sourced papers on open source communities

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
3 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Closed-sourced papers on open source communities

R.Stuart Geiger
Greetings wikiresearchers,

As many of you know (and as we've discussed on this list before), the
copyright licensing of academic papers about communities like
Wikipedia is a huge issue.  I've just written up a blog post about
this, but the tl;dr is that I have a bit of a solution, be it a
partial one.  The gist is basically that asking academics to release
*papers* under a free license is the wrong strategy.  Instead, we
should encourage academics to release *research* under a free license,
and that this can be done in such a way that still makes it complies
with most of the contradictory obligations we have found ourselves in.

It is quite possible to document a research project, its motivations,
its methods, its background, its findings, and even all those charts
and graphs on Meta, using the new Research: namespace and
corresponding templates that were *just* launched -- which everyone
should check out anyway.  And while I'd love some legal non-advice on
this, I think we can do this in such a way that whenever it comes time
to assign copyright to the ACM, all of the CC-BY/CC-BY-SA licensed
graphs can be "used with permission" in a published research paper.
Anyways, the link is below, and I'd love to get some feedback on it:
http://www.stuartgeiger.com/wordpress/random-thoughts/2011/06/12/closed-source-papers-on-open-source-communities-a-problem-and-a-partial-solution/

Thanks!
Stuart Geiger

_______________________________________________
Wiki-research-l mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Closed-sourced papers on open source communities

Manuel Palomo Duarte
I agree with you, Stuart.

You know, the first part of your proposal is what many researchers
do: they publish papers under restrictive licences, but reports,
data sets used for researching and even PhD dissertation are
published under a free licence.

And let me explain other strategy for getting open research: it's
asking governaments to obly by law to publish under free licence
the work funded by them or made by public univs. This is something
WikiMedia Chapter could work on.

In this sense some countries are taking some steps. For example,
Spanish Gobernament has recently approved a law so every
researcher funded by them has to publish the results of his work
in an open directory. More info in Spanish [1].

Best,
Manuel

[1]
http://oaulpgc.wordpress.com/2011/05/16/aprobada-la-ley-de-la-ciencia/

> From: R.Stuart Geiger <[hidden email]>
> Date: 2011/6/13
> Subject: [Wiki-research-l] Closed-sourced papers on open source
> communities
> To: Research into Wikimedia content and communities <
> [hidden email]>
>
>
> Greetings wikiresearchers,
>
> As many of you know (and as we've discussed on this list before),
> the
> copyright licensing of academic papers about communities like
> Wikipedia is a huge issue.  I've just written up a blog post
> about
> this, but the tl;dr is that I have a bit of a solution, be it a
> partial one.  The gist is basically that asking academics to
> release
> *papers* under a free license is the wrong strategy.  Instead, we
> should encourage academics to release *research* under a free
> license,
> and that this can be done in such a way that still makes it
> complies
> with most of the contradictory obligations we have found
> ourselves in.
>
> It is quite possible to document a research project, its
> motivations,
> its methods, its background, its findings, and even all those
> charts
> and graphs on Meta, using the new Research: namespace and
> corresponding templates that were *just* launched -- which
> everyone
> should check out anyway.  And while I'd love some legal
> non-advice on
> this, I think we can do this in such a way that whenever it comes
> time
> to assign copyright to the ACM, all of the CC-BY/CC-BY-SA
> licensed
> graphs can be "used with permission" in a published research
> paper.
> Anyways, the link is below, and I'd love to get some feedback on
> it:
> http://www.stuartgeiger.com/wordpress/random-thoughts/2011/06/12/closed-source-papers-on-open-source-communities-a-problem-and-a-partial-solution/
>
> Thanks!
> Stuart Geiger
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wiki-research-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
>



--
Manuel Palomo Duarte
Software Process Improvement and Formal Methods group (SPI&FM).
Libre Software and Open Knowledge Office (OSLUCA).
Department of Computer Languages and Systems.
Escuela Superior de Ingenieria.
C/ Chile, 1
11002 - Cadiz (Spain)
University of Cadiz
http://neptuno.uca.es/~mpalomo
Tlf: (+34) 956 015483
Mobile phone: (+34) 649 280080
Mobile phone from University network: 45483
Fax: (+34) 956 015139

Aviso legal: Este mensaje (incluyendo los ficheros adjuntos) puede
contener información confidencial, dirigida a un destinatario y
objetivo específico. Si usted no es el destinatario del mismo le
pido disculpas, y le pido que elimine este correo, evitando
cualquier divulgación, copia o distribución de su contenido, así
como desarrollar o ejecutar cualquier acción basada en el mismo.
--
Legal Notice: This message (including the attached files) contains
confidential information, directed to a specific addressee and
objective. In case you are not the addressee of the same, I
apologize. And I ask you to delete this mail, and not to resend,
copy or distribute its content, as well as develop or execute any
action based on the same.

_______________________________________________
Wiki-research-l mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Closed-sourced papers on open source communities

Chitu Okoli
Great idea, Stuart. This is definitely a great, albeit partial, solution!

I'll take it a couple steps further: First, in information systems publications--I don't know about other fields--it is quite common to borrow and adapt tables, not just figures, from other sources. As far as I understand (someone should please correct me if I'm mistaken), this is done under fair use/fair dealing laws. As long as the figures or tables copied or modified are just one small part of the article from which they are taken, copyright infringement has never been an issue. I've certainly copied third-party figures in this way (with appropriate citation, of course), and the journal's editorial office never mentioned a word about it.

Your solution makes this case even stronger: if the journals have no issue with borrowing third-parties' articles or tables under fair use/fair dealing laws, I couldn't imagine they would have an issue with using our own relicensed work.

My second extension: Extending this principle to tables should fill in the gap for qualitative research, which you mentioned in your blog as a possible limitation. You are right that most qualitative research might not be so meaningfully captured in graphs (though there are numerous creative exceptions); however, qualitative articles can effectually summarize the entire substance of their arguments and findings in
well-written textual tables. I'm hoping that the rejuvenated AcaWiki (according to the thread from a couple months past) could provide a CC publication outlet for such tables, in the same spirit as Wikimedia Commons serving for graphs.

~ Chitu
Regards,

-----------------------
Chitu Okoli
Associate Professor in Management Information Systems
John Molson School of Business
Concordia University, Montréal

Phone: +1 (514) 848-2424 x2985
http://chitu.okoli.org/pro

From: R.Stuart Geiger [hidden email]
Date: 2011/6/13
Subject: [Wiki-research-l] Closed-sourced papers on open source 
communities
To: Research into Wikimedia content and communities <
[hidden email]>


Greetings wikiresearchers,

As many of you know (and as we've discussed on this list before), 
the
copyright licensing of academic papers about communities like
Wikipedia is a huge issue.  I've just written up a blog post 
about
this, but the tl;dr is that I have a bit of a solution, be it a
partial one.  The gist is basically that asking academics to 
release
*papers* under a free license is the wrong strategy.  Instead, we
should encourage academics to release *research* under a free 
license,
and that this can be done in such a way that still makes it 
complies
with most of the contradictory obligations we have found 
ourselves in.

It is quite possible to document a research project, its 
motivations,
its methods, its background, its findings, and even all those 
charts
and graphs on Meta, using the new Research: namespace and
corresponding templates that were *just* launched -- which 
everyone
should check out anyway.  And while I'd love some legal 
non-advice on
this, I think we can do this in such a way that whenever it comes 
time
to assign copyright to the ACM, all of the CC-BY/CC-BY-SA 
licensed
graphs can be "used with permission" in a published research 
paper.
Anyways, the link is below, and I'd love to get some feedback on 
it:
http://www.stuartgeiger.com/wordpress/random-thoughts/2011/06/12/closed-source-papers-on-open-source-communities-a-problem-and-a-partial-solution/

Thanks!
Stuart Geiger


_______________________________________________
Wiki-research-l mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l