JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

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JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Andrew Gray-3
The announcement is a few days old, but I missed it (and it doesn't
seem to have turned up on the lists yet), so:

http://about.jstor.org/participate-jstor/individuals/early-journal-content

"On September 6, 2011, we announced that we are making journal content
in JSTOR published prior to 1923 in the United States and prior to
1870 elsewhere freely available to anyone, anywhere in the world.
This “Early Journal Content” includes discourse and scholarship in the
arts and humanities, economics and politics, and in mathematics and
other sciences.  It includes nearly 500,000 articles from more than
200 journals. This represents 6% of the content on JSTOR."

http://about.jstor.org/participate-jstor/individuals/early-journal-content-faqs

Access is through the normal JSTOR interface (which can, if you wish,
be tweaked to only display open content). It's not currently all
available, but is being rolled out in chunks.

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  [hidden email]

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Bob the Wikipedian
Will this be accessible to individuals without access to a subscribed
institution? I've lost my access to JSTOR ever since I graduated in May.

Bob

On 9/9/2011 2:20 PM, Andrew Gray wrote:

> The announcement is a few days old, but I missed it (and it doesn't
> seem to have turned up on the lists yet), so:
>
> http://about.jstor.org/participate-jstor/individuals/early-journal-content
>
> "On September 6, 2011, we announced that we are making journal content
> in JSTOR published prior to 1923 in the United States and prior to
> 1870 elsewhere freely available to anyone, anywhere in the world.
> This “Early Journal Content” includes discourse and scholarship in the
> arts and humanities, economics and politics, and in mathematics and
> other sciences.  It includes nearly 500,000 articles from more than
> 200 journals. This represents 6% of the content on JSTOR."
>
> http://about.jstor.org/participate-jstor/individuals/early-journal-content-faqs
>
> Access is through the normal JSTOR interface (which can, if you wish,
> be tweaked to only display open content). It's not currently all
> available, but is being rolled out in chunks.
>

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

David Gerard-2
On 10 September 2011 16:14, Bob the Wikipedian
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Will this be accessible to individuals without access to a subscribed
> institution? I've lost my access to JSTOR ever since I graduated in May.


I just tried it and could read stuff from 1835 without a login.


- d.

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Andrew Gray-3
In reply to this post by Bob the Wikipedian
On 10 September 2011 16:14, Bob the Wikipedian
<[hidden email]> wrote:
> Will this be accessible to individuals without access to a subscribed
> institution? I've lost my access to JSTOR ever since I graduated in May.

That is indeed the plan, it seems. Post-1870/1922 material will still
be unavailable unless you're at an institution with a subscription to
that specific content, though.

I'm not sure if this applies to content in the general "journal"
collections only, or if it also covers things like the 19th Century
Pamphlets Collection - I suppose the way to find out is to test!

http://www.jstor.org/stable/60100683 is an 1828 pamphlet defending
medical dissection from the Pamphlets Collection.
http://www.jstor.org/stable/25497782 is an 1868 paper on Ogham from
the Ireland Collection.
http://www.jstor.org/stable/25665642 is an 1868 paper on Hegelianism
from one of the general collections.

If you can read all three without a login or without being on a
network belonging to a member, it's worked :-)

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Bob the Wikipedian
The second two links work for guest users; the first requires
institutional subscription. Looks like pamphlets must not be included
for whatever reason.

Bob

On 9/10/2011 12:48 PM, Andrew Gray wrote:

> On 10 September 2011 16:14, Bob the Wikipedian
> <[hidden email]>  wrote:
>> Will this be accessible to individuals without access to a subscribed
>> institution? I've lost my access to JSTOR ever since I graduated in May.
> That is indeed the plan, it seems. Post-1870/1922 material will still
> be unavailable unless you're at an institution with a subscription to
> that specific content, though.
>
> I'm not sure if this applies to content in the general "journal"
> collections only, or if it also covers things like the 19th Century
> Pamphlets Collection - I suppose the way to find out is to test!
>
> http://www.jstor.org/stable/60100683 is an 1828 pamphlet defending
> medical dissection from the Pamphlets Collection.
> http://www.jstor.org/stable/25497782 is an 1868 paper on Ogham from
> the Ireland Collection.
> http://www.jstor.org/stable/25665642 is an 1868 paper on Hegelianism
> from one of the general collections.
>
> If you can read all three without a login or without being on a
> network belonging to a member, it's worked :-)
>

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Fred Bauder-2
According to their announcement not all material has been released yet.
It will be available in stages.

I was able to access an article in Science from May, 1910 which was quite
useful. It is footnote 2 in the article, San Luis Valley

Fred

> The second two links work for guest users; the first requires
> institutional subscription. Looks like pamphlets must not be included
> for whatever reason.
>
> Bob
>
> On 9/10/2011 12:48 PM, Andrew Gray wrote:
>> On 10 September 2011 16:14, Bob the Wikipedian
>> <[hidden email]>  wrote:
>>> Will this be accessible to individuals without access to a subscribed
>>> institution? I've lost my access to JSTOR ever since I graduated in
>>> May.
>> That is indeed the plan, it seems. Post-1870/1922 material will still
>> be unavailable unless you're at an institution with a subscription to
>> that specific content, though.
>>
>> I'm not sure if this applies to content in the general "journal"
>> collections only, or if it also covers things like the 19th Century
>> Pamphlets Collection - I suppose the way to find out is to test!
>>
>> http://www.jstor.org/stable/60100683 is an 1828 pamphlet defending
>> medical dissection from the Pamphlets Collection.
>> http://www.jstor.org/stable/25497782 is an 1868 paper on Ogham from
>> the Ireland Collection.
>> http://www.jstor.org/stable/25665642 is an 1868 paper on Hegelianism
>> from one of the general collections.
>>
>> If you can read all three without a login or without being on a
>> network belonging to a member, it's worked :-)
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> WikiEN-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe from this mailing list, visit:
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikien-l
>



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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Bob the Wikipedian
Regardless of how long it will take them, this is exciting news! Thanks
for sharing, Andrew!

Bob

On 9/10/2011 2:53 PM, Fred Bauder wrote:

> According to their announcement not all material has been released yet.
> It will be available in stages.
>
> I was able to access an article in Science from May, 1910 which was quite
> useful. It is footnote 2 in the article, San Luis Valley
>
> Fred
>
>> The second two links work for guest users; the first requires
>> institutional subscription. Looks like pamphlets must not be included
>> for whatever reason.
>>
>> Bob
>>
>> On 9/10/2011 12:48 PM, Andrew Gray wrote:
>>> On 10 September 2011 16:14, Bob the Wikipedian
>>> <[hidden email]>   wrote:
>>>> Will this be accessible to individuals without access to a subscribed
>>>> institution? I've lost my access to JSTOR ever since I graduated in
>>>> May.
>>> That is indeed the plan, it seems. Post-1870/1922 material will still
>>> be unavailable unless you're at an institution with a subscription to
>>> that specific content, though.
>>>
>>> I'm not sure if this applies to content in the general "journal"
>>> collections only, or if it also covers things like the 19th Century
>>> Pamphlets Collection - I suppose the way to find out is to test!
>>>
>>> http://www.jstor.org/stable/60100683 is an 1828 pamphlet defending
>>> medical dissection from the Pamphlets Collection.
>>> http://www.jstor.org/stable/25497782 is an 1868 paper on Ogham from
>>> the Ireland Collection.
>>> http://www.jstor.org/stable/25665642 is an 1868 paper on Hegelianism
>>> from one of the general collections.
>>>
>>> If you can read all three without a login or without being on a
>>> network belonging to a member, it's worked :-)
>>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> WikiEN-l mailing list
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>> To unsubscribe from this mailing list, visit:
>> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikien-l
>>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Carcharoth
In reply to this post by Andrew Gray-3
I read the FAQ and noticed this:

"Making the Early Journal Content freely available is something we
have planned to do for some time.  It is not a direct reaction to the
Swartz and Maxwell situation, but recent events did have an impact on
our planning."

Anyone know what that is about?

Carcharoth

On Fri, Sep 9, 2011 at 8:20 PM, Andrew Gray <[hidden email]> wrote:

> The announcement is a few days old, but I missed it (and it doesn't
> seem to have turned up on the lists yet), so:
>
> http://about.jstor.org/participate-jstor/individuals/early-journal-content
>
> "On September 6, 2011, we announced that we are making journal content
> in JSTOR published prior to 1923 in the United States and prior to
> 1870 elsewhere freely available to anyone, anywhere in the world.
> This “Early Journal Content” includes discourse and scholarship in the
> arts and humanities, economics and politics, and in mathematics and
> other sciences.  It includes nearly 500,000 articles from more than
> 200 journals. This represents 6% of the content on JSTOR."
>
> http://about.jstor.org/participate-jstor/individuals/early-journal-content-faqs
>
> Access is through the normal JSTOR interface (which can, if you wish,
> be tweaked to only display open content). It's not currently all
> available, but is being rolled out in chunks.
>
> --
> - Andrew Gray
>   [hidden email]
>
> _______________________________________________
> WikiEN-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe from this mailing list, visit:
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikien-l
>

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Fred Bauder-2
> I read the FAQ and noticed this:
>
> "Making the Early Journal Content freely available is something we
> have planned to do for some time.  It is not a direct reaction to the
> Swartz and Maxwell situation, but recent events did have an impact on
> our planning."
>
> Anyone know what that is about?
>
> Carcharoth

Swartz:

http://tech.mit.edu/V131/N30/swartz.html

Maxwell is ours, see

https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikisource/en/wiki/Wikisource:WikiProject_Royal_Society_Journals

I corresponded personally with Jstor, but could not get anyone at the
Wikimedia foundation to discuss material in the public domain with them.
They seem to have gone ahead and made a commitment to make material that
is in the public domain available. I haven't tried to make of copy of
anything yet; however, they have terms of service conditions which seem
to allow only access, not reuse.

Fred


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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Carcharoth
On Sun, Sep 11, 2011 at 9:37 PM, Fred Bauder <[hidden email]> wrote:

>> I read the FAQ and noticed this:
>>
>> "Making the Early Journal Content freely available is something we
>> have planned to do for some time.  It is not a direct reaction to the
>> Swartz and Maxwell situation, but recent events did have an impact on
>> our planning."
>>
>> Anyone know what that is about?
>
> Swartz:
>
> http://tech.mit.edu/V131/N30/swartz.html

Thanks. I thought I recognised the name. I know that name primarily
from the "Who Writes Wikipedia" article. As for this story and
escapade, well, you just couldn't make it up, could you? Reads like a
spy thriller, but with doses of reality such as getting caught.

> Maxwell is ours, see
>
> https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikisource/en/wiki/Wikisource:WikiProject_Royal_Society_Journals

I don't see the connection with Maxwell.

> I corresponded personally with Jstor, but could not get anyone at the
> Wikimedia foundation to discuss material in the public domain with them.
> They seem to have gone ahead and made a commitment to make material that
> is in the public domain available. I haven't tried to make of copy of
> anything yet; however, they have terms of service conditions which seem
> to allow only access, not reuse.

I thought there was something in that FAQ on redistribution. Maybe
have another look?

Carcharoth

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

David Gerard-2
On 11 September 2011 22:05, Carcharoth <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Sun, Sep 11, 2011 at 9:37 PM, Fred Bauder <[hidden email]> wrote:

>> Maxwell is ours, see
>> https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikisource/en/wiki/Wikisource:WikiProject_Royal_Society_Journals

> I don't see the connection with Maxwell.


Greg put the lot up on BitTorrent and wrote an eloquent message which
more or less says "Come on if you think you're hard enough."


- d.

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

David Gerard-2
On 11 September 2011 22:07, David Gerard <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Greg put the lot up on BitTorrent and wrote an eloquent message which
> more or less says "Come on if you think you're hard enough."


(To be precisely, the pre-1923 stuff that is unambiguously public
domain in the US.)


- d.

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Carcharoth
In reply to this post by David Gerard-2
On Sun, Sep 11, 2011 at 10:07 PM, David Gerard <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 11 September 2011 22:05, Carcharoth <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On Sun, Sep 11, 2011 at 9:37 PM, Fred Bauder <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>>> Maxwell is ours, see
>>> https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikisource/en/wiki/Wikisource:WikiProject_Royal_Society_Journals
>
>> I don't see the connection with Maxwell.
>
> Greg put the lot up on BitTorrent and wrote an eloquent message which
> more or less says "Come on if you think you're hard enough."

Ah, I thought it might have been a reference to Greg, but I did
harbour a slight hope that the shade of James Clerk Maxwell might have
been involved as well. Do you have a link to any news articles where
JSTOR and Maxwell are mentioned, as opposed to just Swartz?

Carcharoth

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

David Gerard-2
On 12 September 2011 00:18, Carcharoth <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Ah, I thought it might have been a reference to Greg, but I did
> harbour a slight hope that the shade of James Clerk Maxwell might have
> been involved as well. Do you have a link to any news articles where
> JSTOR and Maxwell are mentioned, as opposed to just Swartz?


Googling "jstor maxwell" produces the obvious results :-)

News coverage:

http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/user-posts-thousands-of-jstor-files-online/32378
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/07/swartz-supporter-dumps-18592-jstor-docs-on-the-pirate-bay.ars
http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20110721/11122615195/aaron-swartz-indictment-leading-people-to-upload-jstor-research-to-file-sharing-sites.shtml
http://gigaom.com/2011/07/21/pirate-bay-jstor/


- d.

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Charles Matthews
In reply to this post by David Gerard-2
On 11/09/2011 22:08, David Gerard wrote:
> On 11 September 2011 22:07, David Gerard<[hidden email]>  wrote:
>
>> Greg put the lot up on BitTorrent and wrote an eloquent message which
>> more or less says "Come on if you think you're hard enough."
>
> (To be precisely, the pre-1923 stuff that is unambiguously public
> domain in the US.)
>
Given the dominant place JSTOR occupies in the sphere of "reliable
sources", we are singularly fortunate (on a strategic view) that their
response has been eirenic.

Charles


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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

David Gerard-2
On 12 September 2011 10:50, Charles Matthews
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Given the dominant place JSTOR occupies in the sphere of "reliable
> sources", we are singularly fortunate (on a strategic view) that their
> response has been eirenic.


I would have been surprised if they had doubled down - they would
pretty obviously have been onto a loser in doing so, and the academic
publishing infrastructure in general is pretty on-the-nose at
present.[1]

If they don't try to sneak in onerous terms of use, it might be worth
WMF saying nice things about the move.


- d.

[1] e.g. in mainstream print newspapers:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/aug/29/academic-publishers-murdoch-socialist

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Carcharoth
On Mon, Sep 12, 2011 at 1:56 PM, David Gerard <[hidden email]> wrote:

> http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/aug/29/academic-publishers-murdoch-socialist

That's an interesting article (not read the other ones yet). I
actually got a job offer from an academic publisher around 11 years
ago (just before Wikipedia started). I sometimes wonder what might
have happened if I'd taken that job instead of the one I took instead.
I'd probably have a different outlook on this whole debate. Though
having done some editing I am sympathetic to the fact that publishing
companies need to make some money to pay those that work for them
(probably through a delayed release after a few years), but clearly
not that much. Having said that, I'm sure I read that a few years ago
there was a big contraction in the journals publishing industry, or am
I imagining that? The whole "digitise a back-catalogue or archive and
make money out of it" thing is not that uncommon, actually. Museums
and libraries and archives sometimes try and do that as well (with
varying degrees of success). Libraries are another matter again. It
depends whether you are after current issues or older issues. The
former is harder with budget cuts, but the latter (older issues) can
usually be ordered up from somewhere. Online access is more
convenient, but not always necessary. Maybe one day people will be
surprised that books were ever offline and not availble online 24/7
from the moment of publication.

Carcharoth

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Sarah-128
On Mon, Sep 12, 2011 at 08:40, Carcharoth <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Mon, Sep 12, 2011 at 1:56 PM, David Gerard <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/aug/29/academic-publishers-murdoch-socialist
>
> That's an interesting article (not read the other ones yet).
> Carcharoth
>
Is this something the Wikipedia Foundation could become involved in --
the creation of a free global archive of academic papers?

I started an article yesterday on a political controversy in Kenya in
1929 about female circumcision --
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Female_circumcision_controversy_%281929%E2%80%931932%29

I was relying in part on a paper from 1976 on jstor, for which they
were asking $34.
http://www.jstor.org/pss/1594780

So the article remains a stub for now. :)

But really, this is extortionate, and it's in no-one else's interests,
because the chances of someone paying $34 for an old article on such
an obscure issue are slim to vanishing, so the only consequence of the
high price is that no one gets to see it.

Sarah

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Carcharoth
On Mon, Sep 12, 2011 at 7:34 PM, Sarah <[hidden email]> wrote:

<snip>

> But really, this is extortionate, and it's in no-one else's interests,
> because the chances of someone paying $34 for an old article on such
> an obscure issue are slim to vanishing, so the only consequence of the
> high price is that no one gets to see it.

I was under the impression that universities and such organisation
have institutional subscriptions where their members can access the
articles, but not at a per-article rate but some other negotiated
rate, or flat rate. I'm sure there are details on the JSTOR website.
So people probably are reading the article in question, but not at the
per-article rate.

Carcharoth

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Re: JSTOR "Early Journal Content" access

Andrew Gray-3
On 13 September 2011 11:27, Carcharoth <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Mon, Sep 12, 2011 at 7:34 PM, Sarah <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> <snip>
>
>> But really, this is extortionate, and it's in no-one else's interests,
>> because the chances of someone paying $34 for an old article on such
>> an obscure issue are slim to vanishing, so the only consequence of the
>> high price is that no one gets to see it.
>
> I was under the impression that universities and such organisation
> have institutional subscriptions where their members can access the
> articles, but not at a per-article rate but some other negotiated
> rate, or flat rate. I'm sure there are details on the JSTOR website.
> So people probably are reading the article in question, but not at the
> per-article rate.

Institutional access is at a flat rate, or rather a bundled flat rate.
($3000 for all content in these collections, another $2000 for those
ones, etc). In this particular example, the article is in the "Arts &
Sciences III" collection of ~150 journals, which would cost a US
public university from $1,300 to $10,000 per year, depending on size,
as an ongoing expense. This is not to say that institutions don't
sometimes pay for individual articles - I know of some which do,
basically treating JSTOR as an expensive but fast on-demand ILL
service - but that most access is via their subscribed collections.

Discounting these users, Sarah's suggestion that it's never likely to
get used is pretty likely. JSTOR don't make very clear numbers on
"pay-per-view" articles available, but their published accounts do
confirm that they don't make very much money from it. We have specific
usage figures for one year only, which suggest that less than *0.005%*
of available articles got purchased in that period - and that those
were mostly at the cheapest end of the spectrum (averaging ~$6).

--
- Andrew Gray
  [hidden email]

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