Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

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Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Emilio J. Rodríguez-Posada
Hi all;

I like the journals that work under the same (or similar) principles of free knowledge projects, a.k.a. open-access journals.

I would like to publish some paper regarding to wikis in that kind of OA publications, do you have any recommendation?

I found First Monday, which is peer-reviewed and OA, but it is not indexed in ISI. Any more suggestions?

Thanks.

Regards,
emijrp

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Pre-doctoral student at the University of Cádiz (Spain)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Samuel Klein-4
I've been thinking recently that we should start this journal.  There isn't an obvious candidate, despite some of the amazing research that's been done, and the extreme transparency that allows much deeper work to be done on wiki communities in the future.  

Would some of the Wikipapers folks be interested in working on this?  I'm thinking of something like a law-review model where much peer review happens by young researchers that are more junior (professionally) than the submitted papers, but very very skilled at review and editorial technique.  Which fits our community as well as it does lawyers.

SJ

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 10:49 AM, emijrp <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all;

I like the journals that work under the same (or similar) principles of free knowledge projects, a.k.a. open-access journals.

I would like to publish some paper regarding to wikis in that kind of OA publications, do you have any recommendation?

I found First Monday, which is peer-reviewed and OA, but it is not indexed in ISI. Any more suggestions?

Thanks.

Regards,
emijrp

--
Emilio J. Rodríguez-Posada. E-mail: emijrp AT gmail DOT com
Pre-doctoral student at the University of Cádiz (Spain)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Jodi Schneider-3
Getting First Monday indexed in ISI would be a good step.

I have helped start an open access journal before [1] so I'd be happy to give advice. But generally, I don't think that we need more journals. 

Rather, let's make open access the journals that we have. This has been done in some communities. For instance, the high energy physics community created a coalition to use existing subscription money (and perhaps new funding) to pay for making journals open access [2]. I would be happy to help create and solicit library and grant funds for such a coalition, with a group of interested people. This would start from identifying a core list of journals.

-Jodi


On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 4:00 PM, Samuel Klein <[hidden email]> wrote:
I've been thinking recently that we should start this journal.  There isn't an obvious candidate, despite some of the amazing research that's been done, and the extreme transparency that allows much deeper work to be done on wiki communities in the future.  

Would some of the Wikipapers folks be interested in working on this?  I'm thinking of something like a law-review model where much peer review happens by young researchers that are more junior (professionally) than the submitted papers, but very very skilled at review and editorial technique.  Which fits our community as well as it does lawyers.

SJ

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 10:49 AM, emijrp <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all;

I like the journals that work under the same (or similar) principles of free knowledge projects, a.k.a. open-access journals.

I would like to publish some paper regarding to wikis in that kind of OA publications, do you have any recommendation?

I found First Monday, which is peer-reviewed and OA, but it is not indexed in ISI. Any more suggestions?

Thanks.

Regards,
emijrp

--
Emilio J. Rodríguez-Posada. E-mail: emijrp AT gmail DOT com
Pre-doctoral student at the University of Cádiz (Spain)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Aaron Halfaker-2
This doesn't solve your problem, but I have two thoughts that might be useful: publishing an open-access of your pay-wall papers and pushing WikiSym to the next level. 

Open access version
I've recently taken up the practice of re-writing my research papers for the internet with an open license.  For example: http://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~halfak/summaries/The%20Rise%20and%20Decline/  I'm not a lawyer, but I'm pretty sure that complete re-writes of any content represent a new creative product.  Sadly, this also might cause confusion about which version of the paper is the "official" version.  I've been including a letter to the reader in my online versions to reduce any confusion.  This approach may solve your immediate need. 

Growing WikiSym into an open conference
WikiSym is a great venue for research on open collaboration systems.  Publications though this conference are included in ACM's digital library and are, as you might expect, not open licensed.  However, the WikiSym community has been on the verge of switching away from ACM towards an open license model for years.  Recently WikiSym has also suffered from stagnation.  Although there is a lot of work on open collaboration systems, most of the best work gets published in other, more general conferences like CSCW for a variety of reasons (higher attendance, lower acceptance rate, etc.).  I see combining the academic WikiSym with the less-academic (but equally, if not more awesome) Wikimania and other conferences/symposiums/communities that are interested in this topic as one potential way to grow the conference and make it a more enticing publication venue.  Such a transition might require a switch to an open publication format.  I'm very interested in continuing this conversation.  

-Aaron

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 10:33 AM, Jodi Schneider <[hidden email]> wrote:
Getting First Monday indexed in ISI would be a good step.

I have helped start an open access journal before [1] so I'd be happy to give advice. But generally, I don't think that we need more journals. 

Rather, let's make open access the journals that we have. This has been done in some communities. For instance, the high energy physics community created a coalition to use existing subscription money (and perhaps new funding) to pay for making journals open access [2]. I would be happy to help create and solicit library and grant funds for such a coalition, with a group of interested people. This would start from identifying a core list of journals.

-Jodi


On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 4:00 PM, Samuel Klein <[hidden email]> wrote:
I've been thinking recently that we should start this journal.  There isn't an obvious candidate, despite some of the amazing research that's been done, and the extreme transparency that allows much deeper work to be done on wiki communities in the future.  

Would some of the Wikipapers folks be interested in working on this?  I'm thinking of something like a law-review model where much peer review happens by young researchers that are more junior (professionally) than the submitted papers, but very very skilled at review and editorial technique.  Which fits our community as well as it does lawyers.

SJ

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 10:49 AM, emijrp <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all;

I like the journals that work under the same (or similar) principles of free knowledge projects, a.k.a. open-access journals.

I would like to publish some paper regarding to wikis in that kind of OA publications, do you have any recommendation?

I found First Monday, which is peer-reviewed and OA, but it is not indexed in ISI. Any more suggestions?

Thanks.

Regards,
emijrp

--
Emilio J. Rodríguez-Posada. E-mail: emijrp AT gmail DOT com
Pre-doctoral student at the University of Cádiz (Spain)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Piotr Konieczny-2
In reply to this post by Jodi Schneider-3
So what does it take to get a journal indexed in ISI?
--
Piotr Konieczny

On 9/14/2012 11:33 AM, Jodi Schneider wrote:
Getting First Monday indexed in ISI would be a good step.

I have helped start an open access journal before [1] so I'd be happy to give advice. But generally, I don't think that we need more journals. 

Rather, let's make open access the journals that we have. This has been done in some communities. For instance, the high energy physics community created a coalition to use existing subscription money (and perhaps new funding) to pay for making journals open access [2]. I would be happy to help create and solicit library and grant funds for such a coalition, with a group of interested people. This would start from identifying a core list of journals.

-Jodi


On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 4:00 PM, Samuel Klein <[hidden email]> wrote:
I've been thinking recently that we should start this journal.  There isn't an obvious candidate, despite some of the amazing research that's been done, and the extreme transparency that allows much deeper work to be done on wiki communities in the future.  

Would some of the Wikipapers folks be interested in working on this?  I'm thinking of something like a law-review model where much peer review happens by young researchers that are more junior (professionally) than the submitted papers, but very very skilled at review and editorial technique.  Which fits our community as well as it does lawyers.

SJ

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 10:49 AM, emijrp <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all;

I like the journals that work under the same (or similar) principles of free knowledge projects, a.k.a. open-access journals.

I would like to publish some paper regarding to wikis in that kind of OA publications, do you have any recommendation?

I found First Monday, which is peer-reviewed and OA, but it is not indexed in ISI. Any more suggestions?

Thanks.

Regards,
emijrp

--
Emilio J. Rodríguez-Posada. E-mail: emijrp AT gmail DOT com
Pre-doctoral student at the University of Cádiz (Spain)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Piotr Konieczny-2
In reply to this post by Samuel Klein-4
This has been proposed before, and I do support it - I think a good case can be made that there is a field in Wikipedia studies (or on a larger scale, wiki studies) - yet there is no dedicated journal. This needs to change.
--
Piotr Konieczny

On 9/14/2012 11:00 AM, Samuel Klein wrote:
I've been thinking recently that we should start this journal.  There isn't an obvious candidate, despite some of the amazing research that's been done, and the extreme transparency that allows much deeper work to be done on wiki communities in the future.  

Would some of the Wikipapers folks be interested in working on this?  I'm thinking of something like a law-review model where much peer review happens by young researchers that are more junior (professionally) than the submitted papers, but very very skilled at review and editorial technique.  Which fits our community as well as it does lawyers.

SJ

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 10:49 AM, emijrp <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all;

I like the journals that work under the same (or similar) principles of free knowledge projects, a.k.a. open-access journals.

I would like to publish some paper regarding to wikis in that kind of OA publications, do you have any recommendation?

I found First Monday, which is peer-reviewed and OA, but it is not indexed in ISI. Any more suggestions?

Thanks.

Regards,
emijrp

--
Emilio J. Rodríguez-Posada. E-mail: emijrp AT gmail DOT com
Pre-doctoral student at the University of Cádiz (Spain)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

metasj
In reply to this post by Jodi Schneider-3
On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 11:33 AM, Jodi Schneider <[hidden email]> wrote:
Getting First Monday indexed in ISI would be a good step.

Yes.  

I have helped start an open access journal before [1] so I'd be happy to give advice. But generally, I don't think that we need more journals. 

Well, we definitely need more arXiv topic areas or equivalents outside the hard sciences.
People should be able to publish their work as quickly as they like in a professional way, especially in fields that change rapidly and need to benefit from collaborating with one another.  
 
SJ

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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Emilio J. Rodríguez-Posada
In reply to this post by Piotr Konieczny-2
Sure, Journal of Wikiology, imagine that : ))

If an open-access journal about wikis is founded, I will collaborate sending papers.

2012/9/14 Piotr Konieczny <[hidden email]>
This has been proposed before, and I do support it - I think a good case can be made that there is a field in Wikipedia studies (or on a larger scale, wiki studies) - yet there is no dedicated journal. This needs to change.
--
Piotr Konieczny

On 9/14/2012 11:00 AM, Samuel Klein wrote:
I've been thinking recently that we should start this journal.  There isn't an obvious candidate, despite some of the amazing research that's been done, and the extreme transparency that allows much deeper work to be done on wiki communities in the future.  

Would some of the Wikipapers folks be interested in working on this?  I'm thinking of something like a law-review model where much peer review happens by young researchers that are more junior (professionally) than the submitted papers, but very very skilled at review and editorial technique.  Which fits our community as well as it does lawyers.

SJ

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 10:49 AM, emijrp <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all;

I like the journals that work under the same (or similar) principles of free knowledge projects, a.k.a. open-access journals.

I would like to publish some paper regarding to wikis in that kind of OA publications, do you have any recommendation?

I found First Monday, which is peer-reviewed and OA, but it is not indexed in ISI. Any more suggestions?

Thanks.

Regards,
emijrp

--
Emilio J. Rodríguez-Posada. E-mail: emijrp AT gmail DOT com
Pre-doctoral student at the University of Cádiz (Spain)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Ward Cunningham
In reply to this post by metasj
On Sep 14, 2012, at 11:09 AM, Samuel Klein wrote:

People should be able to publish their work as quickly as they like in a professional way, especially in fields that change rapidly and need to benefit from collaborating with one another.  

Hmm. What is the quickest way that we would ever want to publish our work? If we push on this hard enough we might change the nature of work. (Yes, I know, much in academia conspires against quick. Same for business and probably dating. But as a thought experiment, how quick could quick be?)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

metasj
I don't know... how about:

You have a good project idea someone should do.  You publish it.
You know some people doing interesting work in the area who need x,y,z to tackle such a project, and add that.
You start a project.  You publish a pointer and project name.
Some collaborators join.  You publish names.
You get a target to take data from, have a meeting, and publish.
You finalize procedures and start implementing.  and publish.
You get first data.  and publish.
You get context for the data.  And publish.
You find time to look at the data, organize the context, add a summary, and publish.
You compile a full schedule of data, and run analysis, publishing your error logs and lab notebook pages on the fly.
You give a paper bag talk with slides (and publish)
You draft an abstract for peer review (and publish)
You finish an abstract and submit it for review (a. p.)
You get feedback from the journal you submitted to (a. p.) and revise (a. p.)
You get included in a major quarterly Journal, with polish (a. p.)
You get public commentary, cites, criticism; and make better talk slides (a. p.)
You add suggestions for your students or others to extend the work in future papers (a. p.)

Various fields adopt various subsets of the above; most have only a handful towards the end.


On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 2:18 PM, Ward Cunningham <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Sep 14, 2012, at 11:09 AM, Samuel Klein wrote:

People should be able to publish their work as quickly as they like in a professional way, especially in fields that change rapidly and need to benefit from collaborating with one another.  

Hmm. What is the quickest way that we would ever want to publish our work? If we push on this hard enough we might change the nature of work. (Yes, I know, much in academia conspires against quick. Same for business and probably dating. But as a thought experiment, how quick could quick be?)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Ward Cunningham
Yup. I'm thinking the same things. Now, if all of these were the norm, how would work be different?

On Sep 14, 2012, at 11:31 AM, Samuel Klein wrote:

I don't know... how about:

You have a good project idea someone should do.  You publish it.
You know some people doing interesting work in the area who need x,y,z to tackle such a project, and add that.
You start a project.  You publish a pointer and project name.
Some collaborators join.  You publish names.
You get a target to take data from, have a meeting, and publish.
You finalize procedures and start implementing.  and publish.
You get first data.  and publish.
You get context for the data.  And publish.
You find time to look at the data, organize the context, add a summary, and publish.
You compile a full schedule of data, and run analysis, publishing your error logs and lab notebook pages on the fly.
You give a paper bag talk with slides (and publish)
You draft an abstract for peer review (and publish)
You finish an abstract and submit it for review (a. p.)
You get feedback from the journal you submitted to (a. p.) and revise (a. p.)
You get included in a major quarterly Journal, with polish (a. p.)
You get public commentary, cites, criticism; and make better talk slides (a. p.)
You add suggestions for your students or others to extend the work in future papers (a. p.)

Various fields adopt various subsets of the above; most have only a handful towards the end.


On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 2:18 PM, Ward Cunningham <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Sep 14, 2012, at 11:09 AM, Samuel Klein wrote:

People should be able to publish their work as quickly as they like in a professional way, especially in fields that change rapidly and need to benefit from collaborating with one another.  

Hmm. What is the quickest way that we would ever want to publish our work? If we push on this hard enough we might change the nature of work. (Yes, I know, much in academia conspires against quick. Same for business and probably dating. But as a thought experiment, how quick could quick be?)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Ward Cunningham
There are lots of other pressures on work. Take for example the principle investigator who after decades of working within the existing system finds one day that his grants aren't to be renewed. Nor are the grants of his professional colleagues. Their labs contract but they are all still there with serious science in front of them.

I've suggested to a friend in this situation that it might be a good time to rethink how academic science works. Pain begets change. Why not get ahead of it?

I'm close enough to science to smell change in the wind. I'm not close enough to lead change. But I will cheer anyone daring enough to step out of old habits and design a future that includes what we've learned about the internet in the last decade or two.


On Sep 14, 2012, at 11:59 AM, Ward Cunningham wrote:

Yup. I'm thinking the same things. Now, if all of these were the norm, how would work be different?

On Sep 14, 2012, at 11:31 AM, Samuel Klein wrote:

I don't know... how about:

You have a good project idea someone should do.  You publish it.
You know some people doing interesting work in the area who need x,y,z to tackle such a project, and add that.
You start a project.  You publish a pointer and project name.
Some collaborators join.  You publish names.
You get a target to take data from, have a meeting, and publish.
You finalize procedures and start implementing.  and publish.
You get first data.  and publish.
You get context for the data.  And publish.
You find time to look at the data, organize the context, add a summary, and publish.
You compile a full schedule of data, and run analysis, publishing your error logs and lab notebook pages on the fly.
You give a paper bag talk with slides (and publish)
You draft an abstract for peer review (and publish)
You finish an abstract and submit it for review (a. p.)
You get feedback from the journal you submitted to (a. p.) and revise (a. p.)
You get included in a major quarterly Journal, with polish (a. p.)
You get public commentary, cites, criticism; and make better talk slides (a. p.)
You add suggestions for your students or others to extend the work in future papers (a. p.)

Various fields adopt various subsets of the above; most have only a handful towards the end.


On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 2:18 PM, Ward Cunningham <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Sep 14, 2012, at 11:09 AM, Samuel Klein wrote:

People should be able to publish their work as quickly as they like in a professional way, especially in fields that change rapidly and need to benefit from collaborating with one another.  

Hmm. What is the quickest way that we would ever want to publish our work? If we push on this hard enough we might change the nature of work. (Yes, I know, much in academia conspires against quick. Same for business and probably dating. But as a thought experiment, how quick could quick be?)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Laura Hale


On Sat, Sep 15, 2012 at 5:12 AM, Ward Cunningham <[hidden email]> wrote:
There are lots of other pressures on work. Take for example the principle investigator who after decades of working within the existing system finds one day that his grants aren't to be renewed. Nor are the grants of his professional colleagues. Their labs contract but they are all still there with serious science in front of them.

I've suggested to a friend in this situation that it might be a good time to rethink how academic science works. Pain begets change. Why not get ahead of it?

I'm close enough to science to smell change in the wind. I'm not close enough to lead change. But I will cheer anyone daring enough to step out of old habits and design a future that includes what we've learned about the internet in the last decade or two.


Randomly and connected to this, I was at a workshop yesterday being run by the Dementia Training Study Centres in Australia.  They are working with their state run and other regional/topic based centres to move more of their materials to open source projects, encourage collaboration on WMF projects, etc.  The discussion was about how they often spent $50,000 to develop tools and resources for academics but these quickly disappear if funding disappears or people move on or the technology backing them no longer works.  By moving to WMF related projects, they can encourage and foster greater collaboration, keep lines of communication more open, better allow the general public to see what they are doing, provide caregivers and others access to better information, etc.

The first step was done yesterday by having a workshop.  Some of the details about what they are doing can be found at http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Caregiving_and_dementia , and it is viewed inside this community as a first step to encourage similar projects in their area.  They are consciously building off the work done by an academic in his classroom where they encouraged student participation on Wikibooks and Wikiversity, along with the History of the Paralympics in Australia project.


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blog: ozziesport.com


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Mathieu ONeil
In reply to this post by Emilio J. Rodríguez-Posada
Hi all

@Samuel Klein: Sorry, don't understand the first part of your question, could you please elaborate.

As for hosting a new "wiki journal", not sure whether it is feasible or desirable. I can't speak for JoPP about such a big decision, it would have to be discussed by the board on our (open and archived) mailing list.

cheers

Mathieu
Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2012 18:22:47 -0400
From: Samuel Klein <[hidden email]>
To: Research into Wikimedia content and communities
<[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Wiki-research-l] Open-Access journals for papers about
Message-ID:
<[hidden email]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

That's awesome.  Are they also a candidate for more public recognition and
attention?  (and would they consider hosting a new wiki journal if there
was enough interest in such an issue?)

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 4:30 PM, Mathieu ONeil <[hidden email]>wrote:

> Hi all
>
> The Journal of Peer Production would be happy to host a wiki / WP special
> issue.
http://peerproduction.net/
>
> JoPP is a peer reviewed, open access journal which makes reviewer reports
> and initial submissions available as well a completed peer reviewed
> articles (like on WP where you can look at article history pages).
>
> cheers
>
> Mathieu
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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Jodi Schneider-3
In reply to this post by metasj
For social sciences, the equivalent of arXiv is SSRN, the Social Science Research Network  [1][2]. arXiv itself is not very open to expanding subject coverage, due to financial pressures [3]. 

-Jodi



On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 7:09 PM, Samuel Klein <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 11:33 AM, Jodi Schneider <[hidden email]> wrote:
Getting First Monday indexed in ISI would be a good step.

Yes.  

I have helped start an open access journal before [1] so I'd be happy to give advice. But generally, I don't think that we need more journals. 

Well, we definitely need more arXiv topic areas or equivalents outside the hard sciences.
People should be able to publish their work as quickly as they like in a professional way, especially in fields that change rapidly and need to benefit from collaborating with one another.  
 
SJ


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Jodi Schneider-3
In reply to this post by Piotr Konieczny-2
On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 6:41 PM, Piotr Konieczny <[hidden email]> wrote:
So what does it take to get a journal indexed in ISI?

See their instruction page:

There is also a list of all journals that *are* indexed, which could be useful:

-Jodi
--
Piotr Konieczny

On 9/14/2012 11:33 AM, Jodi Schneider wrote:
Getting First Monday indexed in ISI would be a good step.

I have helped start an open access journal before [1] so I'd be happy to give advice. But generally, I don't think that we need more journals. 

Rather, let's make open access the journals that we have. This has been done in some communities. For instance, the high energy physics community created a coalition to use existing subscription money (and perhaps new funding) to pay for making journals open access [2]. I would be happy to help create and solicit library and grant funds for such a coalition, with a group of interested people. This would start from identifying a core list of journals.

-Jodi


On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 4:00 PM, Samuel Klein <[hidden email]> wrote:
I've been thinking recently that we should start this journal.  There isn't an obvious candidate, despite some of the amazing research that's been done, and the extreme transparency that allows much deeper work to be done on wiki communities in the future.  

Would some of the Wikipapers folks be interested in working on this?  I'm thinking of something like a law-review model where much peer review happens by young researchers that are more junior (professionally) than the submitted papers, but very very skilled at review and editorial technique.  Which fits our community as well as it does lawyers.

SJ

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 10:49 AM, emijrp <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all;

I like the journals that work under the same (or similar) principles of free knowledge projects, a.k.a. open-access journals.

I would like to publish some paper regarding to wikis in that kind of OA publications, do you have any recommendation?

I found First Monday, which is peer-reviewed and OA, but it is not indexed in ISI. Any more suggestions?

Thanks.

Regards,
emijrp

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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Dariusz Jemielniak-3
In reply to this post by Piotr Konieczny-2
hi,

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 4:00 PM, Samuel Klein <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I've been thinking recently that we should start this journal.  There isn't an obvious candidate, despite some of the amazing research that's been done, and the extreme
> transparency that allows much deeper work to be done on wiki communities in the future.

I'll gladly help and support the idea. I think that just as Mathieu
pointed out, The Journal of Peer Production is a good candidate, since
it is already out there and running (even if low on the radar).
Otherwise, there can be of course a journal dedicated to wiki-related
work, it is quite easy to set it up (e.g. on Open Journal Systems
platform). The key is not setting up a journal, since this is an easy
part, but building a community that would regularly read it and
contribute. In this sense Wikipedia may be a good common ground.

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 7:41 PM, Piotr Konieczny <[hidden email]> wrote:
> So what does it take to get a journal indexed in ISI?

The procedure is quite lengthy and not entirely transparent. In short,
you request being reviewed and from issue X onwards they check how
often an average article from the journal is cited in other ISI
journals. If you go above the threshold, you're in. The problem is
that Thomson arbitrarily decides whether they want to audit a journal,
arbitrarily calculates what constitutes an "article" (yes, it is not
clear - some journals have editorials counted, some don't, in some
cases Thomson calculates the citations for non-articles, but does not
include the number of non-articles in the equation. Scientific, right?
;) invited articles count... or not, research notes - same, etc.). Oh,
and also Thomson arbitrarily may or may not punish by banning you from
ISI for real or imaginary manipulations (such as inbreed citations -
some editors encourage citing other articles from the same journal,
since they count like any others from the ISI list). There's actually
a whole body of literature on journal rankings. Still, this is the
game we have to play.

One key factor in getting ISI is a community to drive the journal - if
Wikipedia research community was widely willing to support one new
journal, received updates etc., it would likely get cited and go off
the ground (the case of "The Academy of Management Learning and
Education" - on the ISI 2 years after the first issue, if I remember
correctly).

Btw, CSCW is on ISI list, but is not open access.

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 6:26 PM, Aaron Halfaker
<[hidden email]> wrote:
> Growing WikiSym into an open conference

unfortunately, this does not help in some fields. For instance, in
management/organization studies conference papers don't count at all,
so actually there is a strong incentive not to go to a conference such
as WikiSym, since it results in wasting a paper you cannot really
publish in  way that would count. European RAEs rely more and more
heavily on ISI and on ERIH rankings, so also non-ranked journals do
not count anymore.

best,

dariusz


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Emilio J. Rodríguez-Posada
The idea of creating a journal just for wikis is highly seductive for me.The "pillars" might be:

* peer-reviewed, but publish a list of rejected papers and the reviewers comments
* open-access (CC-BY-SA)
* ask always for the datasets and offer them to download, the same for the developed software used in the research
* encourage authors to publish early, publish often (as in free software)
* supported by donations

And... we can open a wiki where those who want can write papers in a collaborative and public way. You can start a new paper with colleagues or ask for volunteers authors interested in joining to your idea. When authors think that paper is finished and stable, they submit it to the journal and it is peer-reviewed again and published or discarded and returned to the wiki for improvements.

Perhaps we may join efforts with the Wikimedia Research Newsletter? And start a page in meta:? ; )

2012/9/15 Dariusz Jemielniak <[hidden email]>
hi,

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 4:00 PM, Samuel Klein <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I've been thinking recently that we should start this journal.  There isn't an obvious candidate, despite some of the amazing research that's been done, and the extreme
> transparency that allows much deeper work to be done on wiki communities in the future.

I'll gladly help and support the idea. I think that just as Mathieu
pointed out, The Journal of Peer Production is a good candidate, since
it is already out there and running (even if low on the radar).
Otherwise, there can be of course a journal dedicated to wiki-related
work, it is quite easy to set it up (e.g. on Open Journal Systems
platform). The key is not setting up a journal, since this is an easy
part, but building a community that would regularly read it and
contribute. In this sense Wikipedia may be a good common ground.

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 7:41 PM, Piotr Konieczny <[hidden email]> wrote:
> So what does it take to get a journal indexed in ISI?

The procedure is quite lengthy and not entirely transparent. In short,
you request being reviewed and from issue X onwards they check how
often an average article from the journal is cited in other ISI
journals. If you go above the threshold, you're in. The problem is
that Thomson arbitrarily decides whether they want to audit a journal,
arbitrarily calculates what constitutes an "article" (yes, it is not
clear - some journals have editorials counted, some don't, in some
cases Thomson calculates the citations for non-articles, but does not
include the number of non-articles in the equation. Scientific, right?
;) invited articles count... or not, research notes - same, etc.). Oh,
and also Thomson arbitrarily may or may not punish by banning you from
ISI for real or imaginary manipulations (such as inbreed citations -
some editors encourage citing other articles from the same journal,
since they count like any others from the ISI list). There's actually
a whole body of literature on journal rankings. Still, this is the
game we have to play.

One key factor in getting ISI is a community to drive the journal - if
Wikipedia research community was widely willing to support one new
journal, received updates etc., it would likely get cited and go off
the ground (the case of "The Academy of Management Learning and
Education" - on the ISI 2 years after the first issue, if I remember
correctly).

Btw, CSCW is on ISI list, but is not open access.

On Fri, Sep 14, 2012 at 6:26 PM, Aaron Halfaker
<[hidden email]> wrote:
> Growing WikiSym into an open conference

unfortunately, this does not help in some fields. For instance, in
management/organization studies conference papers don't count at all,
so actually there is a strong incentive not to go to a conference such
as WikiSym, since it results in wasting a paper you cannot really
publish in  way that would count. European RAEs rely more and more
heavily on ISI and on ERIH rankings, so also non-ranked journals do
not count anymore.

best,

dariusz


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Pre-doctoral student at the University of Cádiz (Spain)


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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Federico Leva (Nemo)
emijrp, 15/09/2012 11:12:

> The idea of creating a journal just for wikis is highly seductive for
> me.The "pillars" might be:
>
> * peer-reviewed, but publish a list of rejected papers and the reviewers
> comments
> * open-access (CC-BY-SA)
> * ask always for the datasets and offer them to download, the same for
> the developed software used in the research
> * encourage authors to publish early, publish often (as in free software)
> * supported by donations
>
> And... we can open a wiki where those who want can write papers in a
> collaborative and public way.

Is wiki the best platform currently [*hides from Ward*]?
Is the software/configuration used by (I think) PLOS for a similar thing
available somewhere to build on?

Nemo

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Re: Open-Access journals for papers about wikis

Dariusz Jemielniak-3
hi,

> Is wiki the best platform currently [*hides from Ward*]?
> Is the software/configuration used by (I think) PLOS for a similar thing
> available somewhere to build on?

as mentioned previously, Open Journal Systems is popular
http://pkp.sfu.ca/?q=ojs
PLOS bases on Ambra http://www.ambraproject.org/ which looks decent,
too, but I've never used it.

OJS is quite decent in managing the review process, using templates,
etc. Not as decent as Manuscript Central, but open, and good enough.
Ambra may be even better, maybe somebody used to edit in both and can
comment.

But seriously, starting a journal is not so much about the engine, but
more about the community to drive it. It wouldn't be unprecedented to
start a journal by preparing 1-2 issues WITHOUT a system to process
submissions at all.

best,

dj


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