Re: Wiki-research-l] Country (culture...) as a factor in contributing to collective intelligence projects

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Re: Wiki-research-l] Country (culture...) as a factor in contributing to collective intelligence projects

James Salsman-2
> Why do you think different language Wikipedia's have different
> sizes, outside of the popularity of a given language?

Piotr, if you model organic editing production with a Poisson
distribution, which is reasonable for a first approximation, 3x+
disparities are just natural for the same population sizes:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisson_distribution

I'm not sure the images in that article capture the wide platykurtosis
of large Poisson distributions.

Best regards,
Jim

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Re: Wiki-research-l] Country (culture...) as a factor in contributing to collective intelligence projects

Peter Meyer
Interesting topic!   Here is a useful analogy regarding the distribution of sizes.  There has been study of how big cities are within countries or worldwide, and there are recurring patterns of the scale of the largest to the second largest, and the second-largest to the third, and so forth.

Without getting into this too deeply you might at least check if the size relations among Wikipedias are like those of cities, that is, if they have a similar-looking distribution.  If they do, the underlying forces and dynamics for city sizes might also apply to wikipediae or other sites.

The math is described by Zipf’s law and/or Gibrat’s distribution.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zipf%27s_law <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zipf's_law>, and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibrat%27s_law <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibrat's_law>.  The work by Xavier Gabaix, cited there, was my introduction to it.

Like the choice of what city to move to, the relevant Wikipedias for a user will usually need to be “close” — geographically for a city, or to the languages the user knows for a Wikipedia.  There are other factors driving a user’s choice, if we think of the user as choosing.  If the user wishes to study an obscure academic subject, they may have to use a large wikipedia, and that drives them to also participate there.  If the user is focused on a geographically local subject, that drives the choice.  A larger wikipedia is more useful than a small one, therefore the distribution of wikipedia sizes would be more unequal than the distribution of personal languages.

It sounds like, based on Poland and Korea, you can show that Internet availability is not driving all the difference.  Good to know.  — peter meyer


> On Jul 24, 2018, at 11:30 AM, James Salsman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Why do you think different language Wikipedia's have different
>> sizes, outside of the popularity of a given language?
>
> Piotr, if you model organic editing production with a Poisson
> distribution, which is reasonable for a first approximation, 3x+
> disparities are just natural for the same population sizes:
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisson_distribution
>
> I'm not sure the images in that article capture the wide platykurtosis
> of large Poisson distributions.
>
> Best regards,
> Jim
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wiki-research-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l

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Re: Wiki-research-l] Country (culture...) as a factor in contributing to collective intelligence projects

Dariusz Jemielniak-3
on a slightly related note, I analyzed the cultural preferences for image,
references, links, word count etc. saturation in good and featured articles
on 8 wikis and found significant cultural variation:

http://crow.kozminski.edu.pl/papers/cultures%20of%20wikipedias.pdf

best,

dj

On Tue, Jul 24, 2018 at 7:17 PM, Peter Meyer <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Interesting topic!   Here is a useful analogy regarding the distribution
> of sizes.  There has been study of how big cities are within countries or
> worldwide, and there are recurring patterns of the scale of the largest to
> the second largest, and the second-largest to the third, and so forth.
>
> Without getting into this too deeply you might at least check if the size
> relations among Wikipedias are like those of cities, that is, if they have
> a similar-looking distribution.  If they do, the underlying forces and
> dynamics for city sizes might also apply to wikipediae or other sites.
>
> The math is described by Zipf’s law and/or Gibrat’s distribution.
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zipf%27s_law <https://en.wikipedia.org/
> wiki/Zipf's_law>, and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibrat%27s_law <
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibrat's_law>.  The work by Xavier Gabaix,
> cited there, was my introduction to it.
>
> Like the choice of what city to move to, the relevant Wikipedias for a
> user will usually need to be “close” — geographically for a city, or to the
> languages the user knows for a Wikipedia.  There are other factors driving
> a user’s choice, if we think of the user as choosing.  If the user wishes
> to study an obscure academic subject, they may have to use a large
> wikipedia, and that drives them to also participate there.  If the user is
> focused on a geographically local subject, that drives the choice.  A
> larger wikipedia is more useful than a small one, therefore the
> distribution of wikipedia sizes would be more unequal than the distribution
> of personal languages.
>
> It sounds like, based on Poland and Korea, you can show that Internet
> availability is not driving all the difference.  Good to know.  — peter
> meyer
>
>
> > On Jul 24, 2018, at 11:30 AM, James Salsman <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> >> Why do you think different language Wikipedia's have different
> >> sizes, outside of the popularity of a given language?
> >
> > Piotr, if you model organic editing production with a Poisson
> > distribution, which is reasonable for a first approximation, 3x+
> > disparities are just natural for the same population sizes:
> >
> > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisson_distribution
> >
> > I'm not sure the images in that article capture the wide platykurtosis
> > of large Poisson distributions.
> >
> > Best regards,
> > Jim
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Wiki-research-l mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wiki-research-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
>



--
________________________________________________________
<http://nerds.kozminski.edu.pl/> prof. dr hab. Dariusz Jemielniak
kierownik katedry MINDS (Management in Networked and Digital Societies)
Akademia Leona Koźmińskiego
http://NeRDS.kozminski.edu.pl  <http://nerds.kozminski.edu.pl/>



*Ostatnie artykuły:*

   - Dariusz Jemielniak, Maciej Wilamowski (2017)  Cultural Diversity of
   Quality of Information on Wikipedias
   <http://crow.kozminski.edu.pl/papers/cultures%20of%20wikipedias.pdf>
*Journal
   of the Association for Information Science and Technology* 68:  10.
    2460–2470.
   - Dariusz Jemielniak (2016)  Wikimedia Movement Governance: The Limits
   of A-Hierarchical Organization
   <http://www.crow.kozminski.edu.pl/papers/wikimedia_governance.pdf> *Journal
   of Organizational Change Management *29:  3.  361-378.
   - Dariusz Jemielniak, Eduard Aibar (2016)  Bridging the Gap Between
   Wikipedia and Academia
   <http://www.crow.kozminski.edu.pl/papers/bridging.pdf> *Journal of the
   Association for Information Science and Technology* 67:  7.  1773-1776.
   - Dariusz Jemielniak (2016)  Breaking the Glass Ceiling on Wikipedia
   <http://www.crow.kozminski.edu.pl/papers/glass-ceiling.pdf> *Feminist
   Review *113:  1.  103-108.
   - Tadeusz Chełkowski, Peter Gloor, Dariusz Jemielniak (2016)  Inequalities
   in Open Source Software Development: Analysis of Contributor’s Commits in
   Apache Software Foundation Projects
   <http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/asset?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0152976.PDF>
   , *PLoS ONE* 11:  4.  e0152976.
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Re: Wiki-research-l] Country (culture...) as a factor in contributing to collective intelligence projects

Juliana Bastos Marques
Regarding featured articles, I conducted a small study (should be out in
Oct.) on the Portuguese Wikipedia about those related to Ancient History.
Although the sample was obviously small, my findings were clear and
confirmed by many admins later: most articles are translations/new material
made by a very small group of frequent editors, who use their stats to
legitimate power as admins. Again here, cultural issues pair with specific
community behavior.

Great material, Dariusz, thanks for sharing!

Juliana

On Tue, Jul 24, 2018 at 7:17 PM, Dariusz Jemielniak <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> on a slightly related note, I analyzed the cultural preferences for image,
> references, links, word count etc. saturation in good and featured articles
> on 8 wikis and found significant cultural variation:
>
> http://crow.kozminski.edu.pl/papers/cultures%20of%20wikipedias.pdf
>
> best,
>
> dj
>
> On Tue, Jul 24, 2018 at 7:17 PM, Peter Meyer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > Interesting topic!   Here is a useful analogy regarding the distribution
> > of sizes.  There has been study of how big cities are within countries or
> > worldwide, and there are recurring patterns of the scale of the largest
> to
> > the second largest, and the second-largest to the third, and so forth.
> >
> > Without getting into this too deeply you might at least check if the size
> > relations among Wikipedias are like those of cities, that is, if they
> have
> > a similar-looking distribution.  If they do, the underlying forces and
> > dynamics for city sizes might also apply to wikipediae or other sites.
> >
> > The math is described by Zipf’s law and/or Gibrat’s distribution.
> > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zipf%27s_law <https://en.wikipedia.org/
> > wiki/Zipf's_law>, and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibrat%27s_law <
> > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibrat's_law>.  The work by Xavier Gabaix,
> > cited there, was my introduction to it.
> >
> > Like the choice of what city to move to, the relevant Wikipedias for a
> > user will usually need to be “close” — geographically for a city, or to
> the
> > languages the user knows for a Wikipedia.  There are other factors
> driving
> > a user’s choice, if we think of the user as choosing.  If the user wishes
> > to study an obscure academic subject, they may have to use a large
> > wikipedia, and that drives them to also participate there.  If the user
> is
> > focused on a geographically local subject, that drives the choice.  A
> > larger wikipedia is more useful than a small one, therefore the
> > distribution of wikipedia sizes would be more unequal than the
> distribution
> > of personal languages.
> >
> > It sounds like, based on Poland and Korea, you can show that Internet
> > availability is not driving all the difference.  Good to know.  — peter
> > meyer
> >
> >
> > > On Jul 24, 2018, at 11:30 AM, James Salsman <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
> > >
> > >> Why do you think different language Wikipedia's have different
> > >> sizes, outside of the popularity of a given language?
> > >
> > > Piotr, if you model organic editing production with a Poisson
> > > distribution, which is reasonable for a first approximation, 3x+
> > > disparities are just natural for the same population sizes:
> > >
> > > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisson_distribution
> > >
> > > I'm not sure the images in that article capture the wide platykurtosis
> > > of large Poisson distributions.
> > >
> > > Best regards,
> > > Jim
> > >
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > Wiki-research-l mailing list
> > > [hidden email]
> > > https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Wiki-research-l mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
> >
>
>
>
> --
> ________________________________________________________
> <http://nerds.kozminski.edu.pl/> prof. dr hab. Dariusz Jemielniak
> kierownik katedry MINDS (Management in Networked and Digital Societies)
> Akademia Leona Koźmińskiego
> http://NeRDS.kozminski.edu.pl  <http://nerds.kozminski.edu.pl/>
>
>
>
> *Ostatnie artykuły:*
>
>    - Dariusz Jemielniak, Maciej Wilamowski (2017)  Cultural Diversity of
>    Quality of Information on Wikipedias
>    <http://crow.kozminski.edu.pl/papers/cultures%20of%20wikipedias.pdf>
> *Journal
>    of the Association for Information Science and Technology* 68:  10.
>     2460–2470.
>    - Dariusz Jemielniak (2016)  Wikimedia Movement Governance: The Limits
>    of A-Hierarchical Organization
>    <http://www.crow.kozminski.edu.pl/papers/wikimedia_governance.pdf>
> *Journal
>    of Organizational Change Management *29:  3.  361-378.
>    - Dariusz Jemielniak, Eduard Aibar (2016)  Bridging the Gap Between
>    Wikipedia and Academia
>    <http://www.crow.kozminski.edu.pl/papers/bridging.pdf> *Journal of the
>    Association for Information Science and Technology* 67:  7.  1773-1776.
>    - Dariusz Jemielniak (2016)  Breaking the Glass Ceiling on Wikipedia
>    <http://www.crow.kozminski.edu.pl/papers/glass-ceiling.pdf> *Feminist
>    Review *113:  1.  103-108.
>    - Tadeusz Chełkowski, Peter Gloor, Dariusz Jemielniak (2016)
> Inequalities
>    in Open Source Software Development: Analysis of Contributor’s Commits
> in
>    Apache Software Foundation Projects
>    <http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/asset?id=10.
> 1371%2Fjournal.pone.0152976.PDF>
>    , *PLoS ONE* 11:  4.  e0152976.
> _______________________________________________
> Wiki-research-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
>



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