Request for help with translations for message to Indian communities (Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Odia, Punjabi, Tamil and Telugu.)

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Request for help with translations for message to Indian communities (Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Odia, Punjabi, Tamil and Telugu.)

Chris Koerner-2
Hello,
The Community Engagement department is asking for your help in getting
an announcement translated to the following languages: Bengali,
Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Odia, Punjabi, Tamil and
Telugu. We plan to post complete translations to the Village Pumps of
the languages of India.

Announcement text:
https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:CKoerner_(WMF)/Support_for_our_communities_across_India

I appreciate your prompt support as we need to deliver this message as
soon as we can.

Yours,
Chris Koerner (he/him)
Community Relations Specialist
Wikimedia Foundation

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Re: Request for help with translations for message to Indian communities (Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Odia, Punjabi, Tamil and Telugu.)

Philippe Verdy
Please note that there are more than 8 communities in India.

Already there are 2 major languages at federal level. Hindi is official, but English may be used as an alternate option for communications of Indian states with the federal institutions, and this option was requested and used notably by Indian states or territories whose official regional language is not an Indo-Aryan language (like Hindi or Urdu), notably those using Dravidian languages (in the South of India), or Tibeto-Burmese and Sinitic languages (to the North-East).

And for some states there are a few other Italic or Anglo-Saxon languages kept culturally by their natives (such as French, Portuguese, and Dutch), or some creole languages based on these European languages, most of them being endangered in India and still understood by a small community or those that deal with international affairs and by immigrants or their immediate descendants and relatives that speak those languages at home).

There are already (at least) 26 other languages recognized by one or more states (either for the full state or for some of their local communities) and which are now planned in languages to preserve the very diverse Indian culture.

So this leaves at least  20 important languages that are ignored by your message to the Indian communities.

Note that India actually has hundreds languages (much more than the 28 currently recognized nationally or regionally).


Le mar. 16 juil. 2019 à 23:04, Chris Koerner <[hidden email]> a écrit :
Hello,
The Community Engagement department is asking for your help in getting
an announcement translated to the following languages: Bengali,
Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Odia, Punjabi, Tamil and
Telugu. We plan to post complete translations to the Village Pumps of
the languages of India.

Announcement text:
https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:CKoerner_(WMF)/Support_for_our_communities_across_India

I appreciate your prompt support as we need to deliver this message as
soon as we can.

Yours,
Chris Koerner (he/him)
Community Relations Specialist
Wikimedia Foundation

_______________________________________________
Translators-l mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/translators-l

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Re: Request for help with translations for message to Indian communities (Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Odia, Punjabi, Tamil and Telugu.)

Chris Koerner-2
Thanks Verdy, I'm aware of the language diversity of the Indian
communities. I had to prioritize my request. Adding all 20+ languages
to the title seemed excessive. :)

I did not restrict translations and as always translations to more
languages than what are listed are welcome.

Yours,
Chris Koerner (he/him)
Community Relations Specialist
Wikimedia Foundation

On Tue, Jul 16, 2019 at 4:58 PM Philippe Verdy <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Please note that there are more than 8 communities in India.
>
> Already there are 2 major languages at federal level. Hindi is official, but English may be used as an alternate option for communications of Indian states with the federal institutions, and this option was requested and used notably by Indian states or territories whose official regional language is not an Indo-Aryan language (like Hindi or Urdu), notably those using Dravidian languages (in the South of India), or Tibeto-Burmese and Sinitic languages (to the North-East).
>
> And for some states there are a few other Italic or Anglo-Saxon languages kept culturally by their natives (such as French, Portuguese, and Dutch), or some creole languages based on these European languages, most of them being endangered in India and still understood by a small community or those that deal with international affairs and by immigrants or their immediate descendants and relatives that speak those languages at home).
>
> There are already (at least) 26 other languages recognized by one or more states (either for the full state or for some of their local communities) and which are now planned in languages to preserve the very diverse Indian culture.
>
> So this leaves at least  20 important languages that are ignored by your message to the Indian communities.
>
> Note that India actually has hundreds languages (much more than the 28 currently recognized nationally or regionally).
>
>
> Le mar. 16 juil. 2019 à 23:04, Chris Koerner <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>>
>> Hello,
>> The Community Engagement department is asking for your help in getting
>> an announcement translated to the following languages: Bengali,
>> Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Odia, Punjabi, Tamil and
>> Telugu. We plan to post complete translations to the Village Pumps of
>> the languages of India.
>>
>> Announcement text:
>> https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:CKoerner_(WMF)/Support_for_our_communities_across_India
>>
>> I appreciate your prompt support as we need to deliver this message as
>> soon as we can.
>>
>> Yours,
>> Chris Koerner (he/him)
>> Community Relations Specialist
>> Wikimedia Foundation
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Translators-l mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/translators-l
>
> _______________________________________________
> Translators-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/translators-l

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Re: Request for help with translations for message to Indian communities (Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Odia, Punjabi, Tamil and Telugu.)

Philippe Verdy
Well the important missing languages are Assamese, Bhojpuri, Maithili, Kashmiri, Manipuri, Nepali, Santali, Sindhi, and Urdu (possibly also Goan Konkani, Sanskrit, Tibetan).

Note also that Punjabi also has a distinct (but important) Western Punjabi variant (also officially recognized near the border of Pakistan, but using the Arabic script instead of Devanagari). As well Urdu is a variant of Hindi (both are part of the Hindustani macrolanguage) but written with the Arabic script instead of Devanagari. Even though these variants may be mutually intelligible orally, this is not the case for their written form (both scripts have their own complexities and work very differently, a large majority of Hindustani speakers can only read/write Hindi or Urdu, but not both).

And that Bishnuprya Manipuri is a distinct variant of Manipuri (but spoken by a much smaller community).

India is the most populated country in the world, it's not surprising it has so many languages, and many of them are not "minority languages" and not even endangered languages, as they are really spoken by millions: 20 languages is a strict minimum just to cover languages actually spoken by several millions people in India (and many of them do not speak English or any one of the 8 Indo-Aryan or Dravidian languages you have listed because they don't need it in real life when their linguistic community is already very vivid and benefits for governmental support at least in their own state or territory: for them, English or the 8 languages are just "foreign languages" they don't understand or have extreme dificulties to live with).



Le mer. 17 juil. 2019 à 00:08, Chris Koerner <[hidden email]> a écrit :
Thanks Verdy, I'm aware of the language diversity of the Indian
communities. I had to prioritize my request. Adding all 20+ languages
to the title seemed excessive. :)

I did not restrict translations and as always translations to more
languages than what are listed are welcome.

Yours,
Chris Koerner (he/him)
Community Relations Specialist
Wikimedia Foundation

On Tue, Jul 16, 2019 at 4:58 PM Philippe Verdy <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Please note that there are more than 8 communities in India.
>
> Already there are 2 major languages at federal level. Hindi is official, but English may be used as an alternate option for communications of Indian states with the federal institutions, and this option was requested and used notably by Indian states or territories whose official regional language is not an Indo-Aryan language (like Hindi or Urdu), notably those using Dravidian languages (in the South of India), or Tibeto-Burmese and Sinitic languages (to the North-East).
>
> And for some states there are a few other Italic or Anglo-Saxon languages kept culturally by their natives (such as French, Portuguese, and Dutch), or some creole languages based on these European languages, most of them being endangered in India and still understood by a small community or those that deal with international affairs and by immigrants or their immediate descendants and relatives that speak those languages at home).
>
> There are already (at least) 26 other languages recognized by one or more states (either for the full state or for some of their local communities) and which are now planned in languages to preserve the very diverse Indian culture.
>
> So this leaves at least  20 important languages that are ignored by your message to the Indian communities.
>
> Note that India actually has hundreds languages (much more than the 28 currently recognized nationally or regionally).
>
>
> Le mar. 16 juil. 2019 à 23:04, Chris Koerner <[hidden email]> a écrit :
>>
>> Hello,
>> The Community Engagement department is asking for your help in getting
>> an announcement translated to the following languages: Bengali,
>> Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Odia, Punjabi, Tamil and
>> Telugu. We plan to post complete translations to the Village Pumps of
>> the languages of India.
>>
>> Announcement text:
>> https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:CKoerner_(WMF)/Support_for_our_communities_across_India
>>
>> I appreciate your prompt support as we need to deliver this message as
>> soon as we can.
>>
>> Yours,
>> Chris Koerner (he/him)
>> Community Relations Specialist
>> Wikimedia Foundation
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Translators-l mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/translators-l
>
> _______________________________________________
> Translators-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/translators-l

_______________________________________________
Translators-l mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/translators-l