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Speaker advice thread

Phoebe Ayers-2
Dear all, 

We had planned to have a presentation clinic for speakers at Wikimania, but unfortunately the leader had to cancel at the last moment. So instead...since I imagine lots of people are finishing their talks this weekend, let's share our best advice for giving a presentation with each other! 

My tips are: 

1) Practice! Even going through your talk once in front of a mirror can help a lot. 

2) Share your slides with someone else and see what they think

3) Screenshots are VERY difficult to see at the back of the room - especially screenshots of Wikipedia, because the text is so small & everything is blue & white. Instead, enlarge the portion of the screen you want to show, highlight it with color, or convey it in some other way (like typing out the statistic you want to show).  

4) Don't bring too many slides! Most talks at Wikimania are 25 minutes. That is very short! Plan for one minute per slide - at least - so no more than 15 slides if you also leave time for questions and discussion. 

5) give us your big ideas first. What is your "take away message"? 

6) Don't forget to introduce yourself! What is your affiliation? why are you giving this talk? 

More tips are here: https://wikimania2017.wikimedia.org/wiki/Speaker information
Add your own, or reply here. 

see you very soon! 
Phoebe 

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Re: Speaker advice thread

Leila Zia
Hi Phoebe,

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 11:01 AM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Dear all,
>
> We had planned to have a presentation clinic for speakers at Wikimania, but
> unfortunately the leader had to cancel at the last moment. So
> instead...since I imagine lots of people are finishing their talks this
> weekend, let's share our best advice for giving a presentation with each
> other!

If someone else signing up to help you on this front can reduce some
workload from you, please ping me. I'd be happy to pick up work on
this front or others.

> More tips are here: https://wikimania2017.wikimedia.org/wiki/Speaker
> information
> Add your own, or reply here.

Adding one more tip:

Context: I'm not a native English speaker which means my vocabulary
set is limited, I can make grammatical errors when speaking, and under
stress, I may say things that in sequence may not make sense in
English. ;)

The best advice for this case I've received from a professor some
years ago was to write down /everything/ I want to say about a slide
in the slide notes exactly how I wish I could say it at the
presentation time. Then, I read these notes 2-3 times, and then I do
2-3 runs of the presentation for myself. This approach has worked for
me quite well. Before doing this, I used to waste a lot of time (and I
guess annoy the audience) by saying "emmm" and looking for words in my
mind. On extra tip if you go with this approach: don't read your notes
too many times or you will sound like someone who has memorized a
script. ;)

Writing what you want to say will take time, it takes me between 45-60
min for 15 slides (that I've never presented before), but it's
honestly one of the best uses of that time if you're preparing for a
presentation.

> see you very soon!

can't wait. :)

Best,
Leila

> Phoebe
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wikimania-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l
>

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Re: Speaker advice thread

Lodewijk
Thanks for sharing! 

While some may be concerned that their vocabulary is too limited - the opposite warning must be provided for native speakers. It is often easier to follow a non-native speaker, because they are aware of their limitations. Especially native speakers have the tendency to speak too fast, push in too much content in their presentation and rush through it. Realize that about half your audience (if not more!) is unlikely to speak English as their first language. It sucks, right? Because you always want to tell more.

This also goes with the other tip that I hate: don't be too fancy with your slides. I love to put as little information on slides as possible, trying to make them complement my story. WRONG! With a large number of non-native speakers, it is important that the information is in both. Especially if you have an accent (and sorry native speakers: many of you do, too) you're probably hard to understand for some part of your audience, at some point in your presentation. Having the basic storyline in your sheets doesn't just help the people in the room, but also people who try to follow your presentation online. 

Finally: in an ideal world you upload your slides before your presentation. That way, you can add the link in your last (or first!) slide, so that people can download it, and read along at their own speed - or jot it down/photograph it for later reviewing. ESPECIALLY if you have lots of data/beautiful graphs!

Best,
Lodewijk

PS: if you like to be rogue, you try to hit every single spot in 'bad presentation bingo' here.

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:08 PM, Leila Zia <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Phoebe,

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 11:01 AM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Dear all,
>
> We had planned to have a presentation clinic for speakers at Wikimania, but
> unfortunately the leader had to cancel at the last moment. So
> instead...since I imagine lots of people are finishing their talks this
> weekend, let's share our best advice for giving a presentation with each
> other!

If someone else signing up to help you on this front can reduce some
workload from you, please ping me. I'd be happy to pick up work on
this front or others.

> More tips are here: https://wikimania2017.wikimedia.org/wiki/Speaker
> information
> Add your own, or reply here.

Adding one more tip:

Context: I'm not a native English speaker which means my vocabulary
set is limited, I can make grammatical errors when speaking, and under
stress, I may say things that in sequence may not make sense in
English. ;)

The best advice for this case I've received from a professor some
years ago was to write down /everything/ I want to say about a slide
in the slide notes exactly how I wish I could say it at the
presentation time. Then, I read these notes 2-3 times, and then I do
2-3 runs of the presentation for myself. This approach has worked for
me quite well. Before doing this, I used to waste a lot of time (and I
guess annoy the audience) by saying "emmm" and looking for words in my
mind. On extra tip if you go with this approach: don't read your notes
too many times or you will sound like someone who has memorized a
script. ;)

Writing what you want to say will take time, it takes me between 45-60
min for 15 slides (that I've never presented before), but it's
honestly one of the best uses of that time if you're preparing for a
presentation.

> see you very soon!

can't wait. :)

Best,
Leila

> Phoebe
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wikimania-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l
>

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Re: Speaker advice thread

Phoebe Ayers-2
Thanks Lodewijk & Leila! All good tips. 

One more thing about posting information online is you can share extra data. I encourage everyone to put links etc in their program submission pages on wiki. 

In the actual presentation, you are trying to convey the main idea and, often at Wikimania, you're also trying to recruit other people to work on your project :) If there's detailed information that you want to share but would distract from the main presentation, putting it on the wiki is a good way to share. 

Phoebe 


On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 3:18 PM, Lodewijk <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks for sharing! 

While some may be concerned that their vocabulary is too limited - the opposite warning must be provided for native speakers. It is often easier to follow a non-native speaker, because they are aware of their limitations. Especially native speakers have the tendency to speak too fast, push in too much content in their presentation and rush through it. Realize that about half your audience (if not more!) is unlikely to speak English as their first language. It sucks, right? Because you always want to tell more.

This also goes with the other tip that I hate: don't be too fancy with your slides. I love to put as little information on slides as possible, trying to make them complement my story. WRONG! With a large number of non-native speakers, it is important that the information is in both. Especially if you have an accent (and sorry native speakers: many of you do, too) you're probably hard to understand for some part of your audience, at some point in your presentation. Having the basic storyline in your sheets doesn't just help the people in the room, but also people who try to follow your presentation online. 

Finally: in an ideal world you upload your slides before your presentation. That way, you can add the link in your last (or first!) slide, so that people can download it, and read along at their own speed - or jot it down/photograph it for later reviewing. ESPECIALLY if you have lots of data/beautiful graphs!

Best,
Lodewijk

PS: if you like to be rogue, you try to hit every single spot in 'bad presentation bingo' here.

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:08 PM, Leila Zia <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Phoebe,

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 11:01 AM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Dear all,
>
> We had planned to have a presentation clinic for speakers at Wikimania, but
> unfortunately the leader had to cancel at the last moment. So
> instead...since I imagine lots of people are finishing their talks this
> weekend, let's share our best advice for giving a presentation with each
> other!

If someone else signing up to help you on this front can reduce some
workload from you, please ping me. I'd be happy to pick up work on
this front or others.

> More tips are here: https://wikimania2017.wikimedia.org/wiki/Speaker
> information
> Add your own, or reply here.

Adding one more tip:

Context: I'm not a native English speaker which means my vocabulary
set is limited, I can make grammatical errors when speaking, and under
stress, I may say things that in sequence may not make sense in
English. ;)

The best advice for this case I've received from a professor some
years ago was to write down /everything/ I want to say about a slide
in the slide notes exactly how I wish I could say it at the
presentation time. Then, I read these notes 2-3 times, and then I do
2-3 runs of the presentation for myself. This approach has worked for
me quite well. Before doing this, I used to waste a lot of time (and I
guess annoy the audience) by saying "emmm" and looking for words in my
mind. On extra tip if you go with this approach: don't read your notes
too many times or you will sound like someone who has memorized a
script. ;)

Writing what you want to say will take time, it takes me between 45-60
min for 15 slides (that I've never presented before), but it's
honestly one of the best uses of that time if you're preparing for a
presentation.

> see you very soon!

can't wait. :)

Best,
Leila

> Phoebe
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wikimania-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l
>

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Wikimania-l mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l


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https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l



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Re: Speaker advice thread

Lodewijk
(PS: if anyone wants a dry-run of their presentation one-on-one, I'm more than happy to volunteer with 2-3 presenters, either on hangout (monday) or in real life (Wednesday). Reach out to me off-list. If there's more interest, I imagine we could do a pool somewhere on-wiki :) -- Lodewijk )

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:25 PM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Lodewijk & Leila! All good tips. 

One more thing about posting information online is you can share extra data. I encourage everyone to put links etc in their program submission pages on wiki. 

In the actual presentation, you are trying to convey the main idea and, often at Wikimania, you're also trying to recruit other people to work on your project :) If there's detailed information that you want to share but would distract from the main presentation, putting it on the wiki is a good way to share. 

Phoebe 


On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 3:18 PM, Lodewijk <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks for sharing! 

While some may be concerned that their vocabulary is too limited - the opposite warning must be provided for native speakers. It is often easier to follow a non-native speaker, because they are aware of their limitations. Especially native speakers have the tendency to speak too fast, push in too much content in their presentation and rush through it. Realize that about half your audience (if not more!) is unlikely to speak English as their first language. It sucks, right? Because you always want to tell more.

This also goes with the other tip that I hate: don't be too fancy with your slides. I love to put as little information on slides as possible, trying to make them complement my story. WRONG! With a large number of non-native speakers, it is important that the information is in both. Especially if you have an accent (and sorry native speakers: many of you do, too) you're probably hard to understand for some part of your audience, at some point in your presentation. Having the basic storyline in your sheets doesn't just help the people in the room, but also people who try to follow your presentation online. 

Finally: in an ideal world you upload your slides before your presentation. That way, you can add the link in your last (or first!) slide, so that people can download it, and read along at their own speed - or jot it down/photograph it for later reviewing. ESPECIALLY if you have lots of data/beautiful graphs!

Best,
Lodewijk

PS: if you like to be rogue, you try to hit every single spot in 'bad presentation bingo' here.

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:08 PM, Leila Zia <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Phoebe,

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 11:01 AM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Dear all,
>
> We had planned to have a presentation clinic for speakers at Wikimania, but
> unfortunately the leader had to cancel at the last moment. So
> instead...since I imagine lots of people are finishing their talks this
> weekend, let's share our best advice for giving a presentation with each
> other!

If someone else signing up to help you on this front can reduce some
workload from you, please ping me. I'd be happy to pick up work on
this front or others.

> More tips are here: https://wikimania2017.wikimedia.org/wiki/Speaker
> information
> Add your own, or reply here.

Adding one more tip:

Context: I'm not a native English speaker which means my vocabulary
set is limited, I can make grammatical errors when speaking, and under
stress, I may say things that in sequence may not make sense in
English. ;)

The best advice for this case I've received from a professor some
years ago was to write down /everything/ I want to say about a slide
in the slide notes exactly how I wish I could say it at the
presentation time. Then, I read these notes 2-3 times, and then I do
2-3 runs of the presentation for myself. This approach has worked for
me quite well. Before doing this, I used to waste a lot of time (and I
guess annoy the audience) by saying "emmm" and looking for words in my
mind. On extra tip if you go with this approach: don't read your notes
too many times or you will sound like someone who has memorized a
script. ;)

Writing what you want to say will take time, it takes me between 45-60
min for 15 slides (that I've never presented before), but it's
honestly one of the best uses of that time if you're preparing for a
presentation.

> see you very soon!

can't wait. :)

Best,
Leila

> Phoebe
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wikimania-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l
>

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[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l


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https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l



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Re: Speaker advice thread

Jackie Koerner
I'm going to add a few suggestions:

First, I read a tip about bringing note cards to sessions for people to use to write down questions. This is great for people who might like to write their questions for various reasons. 

Second, we all have words we stumble over. I always practice words a week before my presentation to be sure I don't get nervous and stumble over words.

Third, be sure to understand your audience. Pay attention to body language. It will tell you if people are confused or bored. 

Finally, don't put anything important at the bottom third of the slide. This is difficult for people at the back of the room to see and for people who are using captions on videos for sessions uploaded or streamed. 

Excited to connect with you all soon!

Jackie

On Aug 5, 2017, at 2:28 PM, Lodewijk <[hidden email]> wrote:

(PS: if anyone wants a dry-run of their presentation one-on-one, I'm more than happy to volunteer with 2-3 presenters, either on hangout (monday) or in real life (Wednesday). Reach out to me off-list. If there's more interest, I imagine we could do a pool somewhere on-wiki :) -- Lodewijk )

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:25 PM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Lodewijk & Leila! All good tips. 

One more thing about posting information online is you can share extra data. I encourage everyone to put links etc in their program submission pages on wiki. 

In the actual presentation, you are trying to convey the main idea and, often at Wikimania, you're also trying to recruit other people to work on your project :) If there's detailed information that you want to share but would distract from the main presentation, putting it on the wiki is a good way to share. 

Phoebe 


On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 3:18 PM, Lodewijk <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks for sharing! 

While some may be concerned that their vocabulary is too limited - the opposite warning must be provided for native speakers. It is often easier to follow a non-native speaker, because they are aware of their limitations. Especially native speakers have the tendency to speak too fast, push in too much content in their presentation and rush through it. Realize that about half your audience (if not more!) is unlikely to speak English as their first language. It sucks, right? Because you always want to tell more.

This also goes with the other tip that I hate: don't be too fancy with your slides. I love to put as little information on slides as possible, trying to make them complement my story. WRONG! With a large number of non-native speakers, it is important that the information is in both. Especially if you have an accent (and sorry native speakers: many of you do, too) you're probably hard to understand for some part of your audience, at some point in your presentation. Having the basic storyline in your sheets doesn't just help the people in the room, but also people who try to follow your presentation online. 

Finally: in an ideal world you upload your slides before your presentation. That way, you can add the link in your last (or first!) slide, so that people can download it, and read along at their own speed - or jot it down/photograph it for later reviewing. ESPECIALLY if you have lots of data/beautiful graphs!

Best,
Lodewijk

PS: if you like to be rogue, you try to hit every single spot in 'bad presentation bingo' here.

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:08 PM, Leila Zia <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Phoebe,

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 11:01 AM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Dear all,
>
> We had planned to have a presentation clinic for speakers at Wikimania, but
> unfortunately the leader had to cancel at the last moment. So
> instead...since I imagine lots of people are finishing their talks this
> weekend, let's share our best advice for giving a presentation with each
> other!

If someone else signing up to help you on this front can reduce some
workload from you, please ping me. I'd be happy to pick up work on
this front or others.

> More tips are here: https://wikimania2017.wikimedia.org/wiki/Speaker
> information
> Add your own, or reply here.

Adding one more tip:

Context: I'm not a native English speaker which means my vocabulary
set is limited, I can make grammatical errors when speaking, and under
stress, I may say things that in sequence may not make sense in
English. ;)

The best advice for this case I've received from a professor some
years ago was to write down /everything/ I want to say about a slide
in the slide notes exactly how I wish I could say it at the
presentation time. Then, I read these notes 2-3 times, and then I do
2-3 runs of the presentation for myself. This approach has worked for
me quite well. Before doing this, I used to waste a lot of time (and I
guess annoy the audience) by saying "emmm" and looking for words in my
mind. On extra tip if you go with this approach: don't read your notes
too many times or you will sound like someone who has memorized a
script. ;)

Writing what you want to say will take time, it takes me between 45-60
min for 15 slides (that I've never presented before), but it's
honestly one of the best uses of that time if you're preparing for a
presentation.

> see you very soon!

can't wait. :)

Best,
Leila

> Phoebe
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wikimania-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l
>

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[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l


_______________________________________________
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https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l



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[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l


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Re: Speaker advice thread

Chris Keating-2
In reply to this post by Lodewijk
On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 8:18 PM, Lodewijk <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Thanks for sharing!
>
> While some may be concerned that their vocabulary is too limited - the
> opposite warning must be provided for native speakers. It is often easier to
> follow a non-native speaker, because they are aware of their limitations.
> Especially native speakers have the tendency to speak too fast, push in too
> much content in their presentation and rush through it.

I was literally about to post this. :)

If you *are* a native speaker - please prepare just as well as if you
were speaking in another language, even if you normally "wing it" when
presenting to a native-English audience.

Listening in a second language takes far more effort than listening in
your native language, so please make life easy for your audience!

Record yourself speaking and write down what you actually said. Then
work out how you can cut out subordinate clauses (anything in commas
or parentheses), and try to write in simple past / present / future
tenses where you can.

If you speak in clear English then more people will understand.

Chris

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Re: Speaker advice thread

metasj
In reply to this post by Lodewijk
I would welcome a pool for those who want 1-on-1s to match w someone like Lodewijk for a run through :)

--Sam

On Aug 5, 2017 3:29 PM, "Lodewijk" <[hidden email]> wrote:
(PS: if anyone wants a dry-run of their presentation one-on-one, I'm more than happy to volunteer with 2-3 presenters, either on hangout (monday) or in real life (Wednesday). Reach out to me off-list. If there's more interest, I imagine we could do a pool somewhere on-wiki :) -- Lodewijk )

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:25 PM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Lodewijk & Leila! All good tips. 

One more thing about posting information online is you can share extra data. I encourage everyone to put links etc in their program submission pages on wiki. 

In the actual presentation, you are trying to convey the main idea and, often at Wikimania, you're also trying to recruit other people to work on your project :) If there's detailed information that you want to share but would distract from the main presentation, putting it on the wiki is a good way to share. 

Phoebe 


On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 3:18 PM, Lodewijk <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks for sharing! 

While some may be concerned that their vocabulary is too limited - the opposite warning must be provided for native speakers. It is often easier to follow a non-native speaker, because they are aware of their limitations. Especially native speakers have the tendency to speak too fast, push in too much content in their presentation and rush through it. Realize that about half your audience (if not more!) is unlikely to speak English as their first language. It sucks, right? Because you always want to tell more.

This also goes with the other tip that I hate: don't be too fancy with your slides. I love to put as little information on slides as possible, trying to make them complement my story. WRONG! With a large number of non-native speakers, it is important that the information is in both. Especially if you have an accent (and sorry native speakers: many of you do, too) you're probably hard to understand for some part of your audience, at some point in your presentation. Having the basic storyline in your sheets doesn't just help the people in the room, but also people who try to follow your presentation online. 

Finally: in an ideal world you upload your slides before your presentation. That way, you can add the link in your last (or first!) slide, so that people can download it, and read along at their own speed - or jot it down/photograph it for later reviewing. ESPECIALLY if you have lots of data/beautiful graphs!

Best,
Lodewijk

PS: if you like to be rogue, you try to hit every single spot in 'bad presentation bingo' here.

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:08 PM, Leila Zia <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Phoebe,

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 11:01 AM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Dear all,
>
> We had planned to have a presentation clinic for speakers at Wikimania, but
> unfortunately the leader had to cancel at the last moment. So
> instead...since I imagine lots of people are finishing their talks this
> weekend, let's share our best advice for giving a presentation with each
> other!

If someone else signing up to help you on this front can reduce some
workload from you, please ping me. I'd be happy to pick up work on
this front or others.

> More tips are here: https://wikimania2017.wikimedia.org/wiki/Speaker
> information
> Add your own, or reply here.

Adding one more tip:

Context: I'm not a native English speaker which means my vocabulary
set is limited, I can make grammatical errors when speaking, and under
stress, I may say things that in sequence may not make sense in
English. ;)

The best advice for this case I've received from a professor some
years ago was to write down /everything/ I want to say about a slide
in the slide notes exactly how I wish I could say it at the
presentation time. Then, I read these notes 2-3 times, and then I do
2-3 runs of the presentation for myself. This approach has worked for
me quite well. Before doing this, I used to waste a lot of time (and I
guess annoy the audience) by saying "emmm" and looking for words in my
mind. On extra tip if you go with this approach: don't read your notes
too many times or you will sound like someone who has memorized a
script. ;)

Writing what you want to say will take time, it takes me between 45-60
min for 15 slides (that I've never presented before), but it's
honestly one of the best uses of that time if you're preparing for a
presentation.

> see you very soon!

can't wait. :)

Best,
Leila

> Phoebe
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wikimania-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l
>

_______________________________________________
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Re: Speaker advice thread

Lodewijk

Are you volunteering? :)

On Aug 7, 2017 5:26 AM, "Samuel Klein" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I would welcome a pool for those who want 1-on-1s to match w someone like Lodewijk for a run through :)

--Sam

On Aug 5, 2017 3:29 PM, "Lodewijk" <[hidden email]> wrote:
(PS: if anyone wants a dry-run of their presentation one-on-one, I'm more than happy to volunteer with 2-3 presenters, either on hangout (monday) or in real life (Wednesday). Reach out to me off-list. If there's more interest, I imagine we could do a pool somewhere on-wiki :) -- Lodewijk )

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:25 PM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Lodewijk & Leila! All good tips. 

One more thing about posting information online is you can share extra data. I encourage everyone to put links etc in their program submission pages on wiki. 

In the actual presentation, you are trying to convey the main idea and, often at Wikimania, you're also trying to recruit other people to work on your project :) If there's detailed information that you want to share but would distract from the main presentation, putting it on the wiki is a good way to share. 

Phoebe 


On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 3:18 PM, Lodewijk <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks for sharing! 

While some may be concerned that their vocabulary is too limited - the opposite warning must be provided for native speakers. It is often easier to follow a non-native speaker, because they are aware of their limitations. Especially native speakers have the tendency to speak too fast, push in too much content in their presentation and rush through it. Realize that about half your audience (if not more!) is unlikely to speak English as their first language. It sucks, right? Because you always want to tell more.

This also goes with the other tip that I hate: don't be too fancy with your slides. I love to put as little information on slides as possible, trying to make them complement my story. WRONG! With a large number of non-native speakers, it is important that the information is in both. Especially if you have an accent (and sorry native speakers: many of you do, too) you're probably hard to understand for some part of your audience, at some point in your presentation. Having the basic storyline in your sheets doesn't just help the people in the room, but also people who try to follow your presentation online. 

Finally: in an ideal world you upload your slides before your presentation. That way, you can add the link in your last (or first!) slide, so that people can download it, and read along at their own speed - or jot it down/photograph it for later reviewing. ESPECIALLY if you have lots of data/beautiful graphs!

Best,
Lodewijk

PS: if you like to be rogue, you try to hit every single spot in 'bad presentation bingo' here.

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:08 PM, Leila Zia <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Phoebe,

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 11:01 AM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Dear all,
>
> We had planned to have a presentation clinic for speakers at Wikimania, but
> unfortunately the leader had to cancel at the last moment. So
> instead...since I imagine lots of people are finishing their talks this
> weekend, let's share our best advice for giving a presentation with each
> other!

If someone else signing up to help you on this front can reduce some
workload from you, please ping me. I'd be happy to pick up work on
this front or others.

> More tips are here: https://wikimania2017.wikimedia.org/wiki/Speaker
> information
> Add your own, or reply here.

Adding one more tip:

Context: I'm not a native English speaker which means my vocabulary
set is limited, I can make grammatical errors when speaking, and under
stress, I may say things that in sequence may not make sense in
English. ;)

The best advice for this case I've received from a professor some
years ago was to write down /everything/ I want to say about a slide
in the slide notes exactly how I wish I could say it at the
presentation time. Then, I read these notes 2-3 times, and then I do
2-3 runs of the presentation for myself. This approach has worked for
me quite well. Before doing this, I used to waste a lot of time (and I
guess annoy the audience) by saying "emmm" and looking for words in my
mind. On extra tip if you go with this approach: don't read your notes
too many times or you will sound like someone who has memorized a
script. ;)

Writing what you want to say will take time, it takes me between 45-60
min for 15 slides (that I've never presented before), but it's
honestly one of the best uses of that time if you're preparing for a
presentation.

> see you very soon!

can't wait. :)

Best,
Leila

> Phoebe
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wikimania-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l
>

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Re: Speaker advice thread

Rachel Farrand
Just for fun, I made an etherpad for this. 
Sign up here if you volunteer to help someone else by listening to their presentation.
If you want help on your presentation, just contact someone on this list.  

On Sun, Aug 6, 2017 at 11:35 PM, Lodewijk <[hidden email]> wrote:

Are you volunteering? :)

On Aug 7, 2017 5:26 AM, "Samuel Klein" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I would welcome a pool for those who want 1-on-1s to match w someone like Lodewijk for a run through :)

--Sam

On Aug 5, 2017 3:29 PM, "Lodewijk" <[hidden email]> wrote:
(PS: if anyone wants a dry-run of their presentation one-on-one, I'm more than happy to volunteer with 2-3 presenters, either on hangout (monday) or in real life (Wednesday). Reach out to me off-list. If there's more interest, I imagine we could do a pool somewhere on-wiki :) -- Lodewijk )

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:25 PM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Lodewijk & Leila! All good tips. 

One more thing about posting information online is you can share extra data. I encourage everyone to put links etc in their program submission pages on wiki. 

In the actual presentation, you are trying to convey the main idea and, often at Wikimania, you're also trying to recruit other people to work on your project :) If there's detailed information that you want to share but would distract from the main presentation, putting it on the wiki is a good way to share. 

Phoebe 


On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 3:18 PM, Lodewijk <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks for sharing! 

While some may be concerned that their vocabulary is too limited - the opposite warning must be provided for native speakers. It is often easier to follow a non-native speaker, because they are aware of their limitations. Especially native speakers have the tendency to speak too fast, push in too much content in their presentation and rush through it. Realize that about half your audience (if not more!) is unlikely to speak English as their first language. It sucks, right? Because you always want to tell more.

This also goes with the other tip that I hate: don't be too fancy with your slides. I love to put as little information on slides as possible, trying to make them complement my story. WRONG! With a large number of non-native speakers, it is important that the information is in both. Especially if you have an accent (and sorry native speakers: many of you do, too) you're probably hard to understand for some part of your audience, at some point in your presentation. Having the basic storyline in your sheets doesn't just help the people in the room, but also people who try to follow your presentation online. 

Finally: in an ideal world you upload your slides before your presentation. That way, you can add the link in your last (or first!) slide, so that people can download it, and read along at their own speed - or jot it down/photograph it for later reviewing. ESPECIALLY if you have lots of data/beautiful graphs!

Best,
Lodewijk

PS: if you like to be rogue, you try to hit every single spot in 'bad presentation bingo' here.

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:08 PM, Leila Zia <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Phoebe,

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 11:01 AM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Dear all,
>
> We had planned to have a presentation clinic for speakers at Wikimania, but
> unfortunately the leader had to cancel at the last moment. So
> instead...since I imagine lots of people are finishing their talks this
> weekend, let's share our best advice for giving a presentation with each
> other!

If someone else signing up to help you on this front can reduce some
workload from you, please ping me. I'd be happy to pick up work on
this front or others.

> More tips are here: https://wikimania2017.wikimedia.org/wiki/Speaker
> information
> Add your own, or reply here.

Adding one more tip:

Context: I'm not a native English speaker which means my vocabulary
set is limited, I can make grammatical errors when speaking, and under
stress, I may say things that in sequence may not make sense in
English. ;)

The best advice for this case I've received from a professor some
years ago was to write down /everything/ I want to say about a slide
in the slide notes exactly how I wish I could say it at the
presentation time. Then, I read these notes 2-3 times, and then I do
2-3 runs of the presentation for myself. This approach has worked for
me quite well. Before doing this, I used to waste a lot of time (and I
guess annoy the audience) by saying "emmm" and looking for words in my
mind. On extra tip if you go with this approach: don't read your notes
too many times or you will sound like someone who has memorized a
script. ;)

Writing what you want to say will take time, it takes me between 45-60
min for 15 slides (that I've never presented before), but it's
honestly one of the best uses of that time if you're preparing for a
presentation.

> see you very soon!

can't wait. :)

Best,
Leila

> Phoebe
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wikimania-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l
>

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--
Rachel Farrand
Events Program Manager
Technical Collaboration Team 
Wikimedia Foundation 

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Re: Speaker advice thread

Phoebe Ayers-2
Thanks Rachel! you are amazing.

Andrew Lih has just put a session on the Thursday unconference program for Wikiconference North America for this -- 1:30-3:30 on Thursday, in the Sheraton.
https://wikiconference.org/wiki/2017/Unconference#Unconference_ideas_.28unsorted.29

If you are registered for any preconference on Thursday and you want to join this session, drop on by! Speakers/mentors can self-organize with the etherpad, below.

I will try my best to join as well to give feedback on presentations but I know better than to promise to show up places when running wikimanias :)
best,
Phoebe

On Mon, Aug 7, 2017 at 10:10 AM, Rachel Farrand <[hidden email]> wrote:
Just for fun, I made an etherpad for this. 
Sign up here if you volunteer to help someone else by listening to their presentation.
If you want help on your presentation, just contact someone on this list.  

On Sun, Aug 6, 2017 at 11:35 PM, Lodewijk <[hidden email]> wrote:

Are you volunteering? :)

On Aug 7, 2017 5:26 AM, "Samuel Klein" <[hidden email]> wrote:
I would welcome a pool for those who want 1-on-1s to match w someone like Lodewijk for a run through :)

--Sam

On Aug 5, 2017 3:29 PM, "Lodewijk" <[hidden email]> wrote:
(PS: if anyone wants a dry-run of their presentation one-on-one, I'm more than happy to volunteer with 2-3 presenters, either on hangout (monday) or in real life (Wednesday). Reach out to me off-list. If there's more interest, I imagine we could do a pool somewhere on-wiki :) -- Lodewijk )

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:25 PM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks Lodewijk & Leila! All good tips. 

One more thing about posting information online is you can share extra data. I encourage everyone to put links etc in their program submission pages on wiki. 

In the actual presentation, you are trying to convey the main idea and, often at Wikimania, you're also trying to recruit other people to work on your project :) If there's detailed information that you want to share but would distract from the main presentation, putting it on the wiki is a good way to share. 

Phoebe 


On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 3:18 PM, Lodewijk <[hidden email]> wrote:
Thanks for sharing! 

While some may be concerned that their vocabulary is too limited - the opposite warning must be provided for native speakers. It is often easier to follow a non-native speaker, because they are aware of their limitations. Especially native speakers have the tendency to speak too fast, push in too much content in their presentation and rush through it. Realize that about half your audience (if not more!) is unlikely to speak English as their first language. It sucks, right? Because you always want to tell more.

This also goes with the other tip that I hate: don't be too fancy with your slides. I love to put as little information on slides as possible, trying to make them complement my story. WRONG! With a large number of non-native speakers, it is important that the information is in both. Especially if you have an accent (and sorry native speakers: many of you do, too) you're probably hard to understand for some part of your audience, at some point in your presentation. Having the basic storyline in your sheets doesn't just help the people in the room, but also people who try to follow your presentation online. 

Finally: in an ideal world you upload your slides before your presentation. That way, you can add the link in your last (or first!) slide, so that people can download it, and read along at their own speed - or jot it down/photograph it for later reviewing. ESPECIALLY if you have lots of data/beautiful graphs!

Best,
Lodewijk

PS: if you like to be rogue, you try to hit every single spot in 'bad presentation bingo' here.

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 9:08 PM, Leila Zia <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Phoebe,

On Sat, Aug 5, 2017 at 11:01 AM, phoebe ayers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Dear all,
>
> We had planned to have a presentation clinic for speakers at Wikimania, but
> unfortunately the leader had to cancel at the last moment. So
> instead...since I imagine lots of people are finishing their talks this
> weekend, let's share our best advice for giving a presentation with each
> other!

If someone else signing up to help you on this front can reduce some
workload from you, please ping me. I'd be happy to pick up work on
this front or others.

> More tips are here: https://wikimania2017.wikimedia.org/wiki/Speaker
> information
> Add your own, or reply here.

Adding one more tip:

Context: I'm not a native English speaker which means my vocabulary
set is limited, I can make grammatical errors when speaking, and under
stress, I may say things that in sequence may not make sense in
English. ;)

The best advice for this case I've received from a professor some
years ago was to write down /everything/ I want to say about a slide
in the slide notes exactly how I wish I could say it at the
presentation time. Then, I read these notes 2-3 times, and then I do
2-3 runs of the presentation for myself. This approach has worked for
me quite well. Before doing this, I used to waste a lot of time (and I
guess annoy the audience) by saying "emmm" and looking for words in my
mind. On extra tip if you go with this approach: don't read your notes
too many times or you will sound like someone who has memorized a
script. ;)

Writing what you want to say will take time, it takes me between 45-60
min for 15 slides (that I've never presented before), but it's
honestly one of the best uses of that time if you're preparing for a
presentation.

> see you very soon!

can't wait. :)

Best,
Leila

> Phoebe
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wikimania-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikimania-l
>

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--
Rachel Farrand
Events Program Manager
Technical Collaboration Team 
Wikimedia Foundation 

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Re: Speaker advice thread

Pine W
I'd like to suggest that a collection of tips for presenters would be good to add to the Learning Patterns Library.

Pine



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