Speaking on Wikipedia in/and schools

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Speaking on Wikipedia in/and schools

Brianna Laugher
Hello all,

I am thinking to make a submission to a "computers in education"
conference, either a non-refereed paper or a "workshop". The audience
will be "teachers and teacher educators". Around 600 people will
attend. The conference is held every two years.
One of the conference themes is "E-learning including information
literacy, Web 2.0 and school libraries".
At first I thought to do a workshop, but their computer labs have only
15-20 computers, which seems very limited to me. So then it seems like
a non-refereed paper is best.

I think a good topic might be '"Safe wiki": Teaching responsible use
of Wikipedia', as just like sex, an abstinence-only approach will not
be very successful when it comes to students & Wikipedia. ;)

Anyway I figure there may be some people here familiar with this kind
of research, although I am not submitting a refereed paper it would
still be useful to see what has been done before.
I recall the wiki research bibliography - is it still alive? Both
<http://bibliography.wikimedia.de/> and
<http://tools.wikimedia.de/~voj/bibliography/> are dead links...

thanks,
Brianna

--
They've just been waiting in a mountain for the right moment:
http://modernthings.org/

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Re: Speaking on Wikipedia in/and schools

Gerard Meijssen-3
Hoi,
Did you have a look at Wikieducator.. I am sure you will find lots of great information. It is a pity that you do speak Chinese and not Dutch because otherwise Kennisnet would also be a great resource. You may want to talk to Galwaygirl.
Thanks,
     GerardM

On Feb 19, 2008 6:26 AM, Brianna Laugher <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello all,

I am thinking to make a submission to a "computers in education"
conference, either a non-refereed paper or a "workshop". The audience
will be "teachers and teacher educators". Around 600 people will
attend. The conference is held every two years.
One of the conference themes is "E-learning including information
literacy, Web 2.0 and school libraries".
At first I thought to do a workshop, but their computer labs have only
15-20 computers, which seems very limited to me. So then it seems like
a non-refereed paper is best.

I think a good topic might be '"Safe wiki": Teaching responsible use
of Wikipedia', as just like sex, an abstinence-only approach will not
be very successful when it comes to students & Wikipedia. ;)

Anyway I figure there may be some people here familiar with this kind
of research, although I am not submitting a refereed paper it would
still be useful to see what has been done before.
I recall the wiki research bibliography - is it still alive? Both
<http://bibliography.wikimedia.de/> and
<http://tools.wikimedia.de/~voj/bibliography/> are dead links...

thanks,
Brianna

--
They've just been waiting in a mountain for the right moment:
http://modernthings.org/

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[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l


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Re: Speaking on Wikipedia in/and schools

Andrea Forte
In reply to this post by Brianna Laugher
Hi Brianna,

I do research in American high schools on how students think about
information sources. I also do research on social structure and agency
in Wikipedia. Put them together and you've got something like the
attached symposium abstract, "Information Literacy in the Age of
Wikipedia" which will appear at International Conference of the
Learning Sciences this summer. It's super short, though.
</shameless self-promotion>

I don't know who else has actually done empirical work on this issue
with young people and teachers/parents, although there is a lot of
punditry out there on all sides of the issue. MacArthur Foundation's
digital literacy project is a place to look too. Henry Jenkins has
written about Wikipedia and literacy here:
http://www.henryjenkins.org/2007/06/what_wikipedia_can_teach_us_ab.html

Also important to make clear: Wikipedia != wiki. I think it is
particularly important for educators to understand wiki is a tool that
supports collaborative writing. Some teachers use wiki to support
student writing activities in software like moodle or externally
hosted sites and already understand this distinction, but you'd be
surprised how many people appreciate even this basic information. It
helps in understanding what Wikipedia is and how it works.

I have gone to a few teacher conferences specifically to talk about
these kinds of issues and am glad to hear of others doing the same! :)

Andrea

_______________________________________________________________
Andrea Forte
PhD Candidate, Human-Centered Computing
Georgia Institute of Technology
http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~aforte


On Feb 19, 2008 12:26 AM, Brianna Laugher <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> I am thinking to make a submission to a "computers in education"
> conference, either a non-refereed paper or a "workshop". The audience
> will be "teachers and teacher educators". Around 600 people will
> attend. The conference is held every two years.
> One of the conference themes is "E-learning including information
> literacy, Web 2.0 and school libraries".
> At first I thought to do a workshop, but their computer labs have only
> 15-20 computers, which seems very limited to me. So then it seems like
> a non-refereed paper is best.
>
> I think a good topic might be '"Safe wiki": Teaching responsible use
> of Wikipedia', as just like sex, an abstinence-only approach will not
> be very successful when it comes to students & Wikipedia. ;)
>
> Anyway I figure there may be some people here familiar with this kind
> of research, although I am not submitting a refereed paper it would
> still be useful to see what has been done before.
> I recall the wiki research bibliography - is it still alive? Both
> <http://bibliography.wikimedia.de/> and
> <http://tools.wikimedia.de/~voj/bibliography/> are dead links...
>
> thanks,
> Brianna
>
> --
> They've just been waiting in a mountain for the right moment:
> http://modernthings.org/
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wiki-research-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
>

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Learning Information Literacy in the Age of Wikipedia.pdf (36K) Download Attachment
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Re: Speaking on Wikipedia in/and schools

Andrea Forte
Hi all,

yes, I do realize that the pdf I sent was missing the most interesting
part. I have pasted the references below. And my apologies for
spamming the list with an attachment in the first place. I intended to
send it to Brianna only, since it is actually a couple pages out of a
longer symposium abstract that is not yet publication ready. The final
version will go up on my website in a couple weeks.

Thanks for your continued patience with my early morning, pre-coffee
lack of email etiquette. :)

Andrea


REFERENCES

Bryant, S., Forte, A. & Bruckman, A. (2005,). "Becoming Wikipedian:
transformation of participation in a collaborative online
encyclopedia." GROUP, (Sanibel Island, FL).

Forte, Andrea and Amy Bruckman. (2008). Scaling consensus: increasing
decentralization in Wikipedia governance. Proceedings of Hawaiian
International Conference of Systems Sciences (HICSS).

Forte, Andrea and Amy Bruckman. (2006) From Wikipedia to the
classroom: exploring online publication and learning. Proceedings of
the International Conference of the Learning Sciences, Vol 1.
Bloomington, IN, pp. 182-188.

Kafai, Y. and Bates, M.J. (1997). "Internet Web-Searching Instruction
in the Elementary Classroom: Building a Foundation for Information
Literacy" School Library Media Quarterly, 25(2), pp. 103-111.

Lave, J. & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated Learning: legitimate peripheral
participation. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Kriplean, T, Beschastnikh, I, McDonald, D. and Golder, S. (2007).
"Community, Consensus, Coercion, Control: CS*W or How Policy Mediates
Mass Participation" GROUP (Sanibel Island, FL). pp 167-176.

Kuiper, E., Volman, M. and Terwel, J. (2005). "The Web as an
Information Resource in K-12 Education: Strategies for Supporting
Students in Searching and Processing Information." Review of
Educational Research, 75(3), pp. 285-328.

Stadtler, M. & Bromme, R. (2007) Dealing with multiple documents on
the WWW: The role of meta-cognition in the formation of documents
models. International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative
Learning, 2(2-3), pp. 191-210.

Viegas, F., Wattenberg, M., Kriss, J. and van Ham, F. "Talk before you
type: coordination in Wikipedia." Hawai'ian International Conference
on System Sciences, 2007.

Viegas, F., Wattenberg, M. and McKeon, M. "The hidden order of
Wikipedia." HCII (Beijing), 2007.

Wallace, R.M., Kupperman, J., Krajcik, J. and Soloway, E. (2000).
"Science on the Web: Students Online in a Sixth-Grade Classroom."
Journal of the Learning Sciences, 9(1), pp. 75-104.

Wilkinson, D.M. and Huberman, B.A. "Assessing the value of cooperation
in Wikipedia" First Monday, 12(4) URL:
http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue12_4/wilkinson/index.html

Wineburg, S. S. (1991). Historical problem solving: A study of the
cognitive processes used in the evaluation of documentary and
pictorial evidence. Journal of Educational Psychology, 83, 79.


_______________________________________________________________
Andrea Forte
PhD Candidate, Human-Centered Computing
Georgia Institute of Technology
http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~aforte


On Feb 19, 2008 6:33 AM, Andrea Forte <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Brianna,
>
> I do research in American high schools on how students think about
> information sources. I also do research on social structure and agency
> in Wikipedia. Put them together and you've got something like the
> attached symposium abstract, "Information Literacy in the Age of
> Wikipedia" which will appear at International Conference of the
> Learning Sciences this summer. It's super short, though.
> </shameless self-promotion>
>
> I don't know who else has actually done empirical work on this issue
> with young people and teachers/parents, although there is a lot of
> punditry out there on all sides of the issue. MacArthur Foundation's
> digital literacy project is a place to look too. Henry Jenkins has
> written about Wikipedia and literacy here:
> http://www.henryjenkins.org/2007/06/what_wikipedia_can_teach_us_ab.html
>
> Also important to make clear: Wikipedia != wiki. I think it is
> particularly important for educators to understand wiki is a tool that
> supports collaborative writing. Some teachers use wiki to support
> student writing activities in software like moodle or externally
> hosted sites and already understand this distinction, but you'd be
> surprised how many people appreciate even this basic information. It
> helps in understanding what Wikipedia is and how it works.
>
> I have gone to a few teacher conferences specifically to talk about
> these kinds of issues and am glad to hear of others doing the same! :)
>
> Andrea
>
> _______________________________________________________________
> Andrea Forte
> PhD Candidate, Human-Centered Computing
> Georgia Institute of Technology
> http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~aforte
>
>
>
> On Feb 19, 2008 12:26 AM, Brianna Laugher <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > Hello all,
> >
> > I am thinking to make a submission to a "computers in education"
> > conference, either a non-refereed paper or a "workshop". The audience
> > will be "teachers and teacher educators". Around 600 people will
> > attend. The conference is held every two years.
> > One of the conference themes is "E-learning including information
> > literacy, Web 2.0 and school libraries".
> > At first I thought to do a workshop, but their computer labs have only
> > 15-20 computers, which seems very limited to me. So then it seems like
> > a non-refereed paper is best.
> >
> > I think a good topic might be '"Safe wiki": Teaching responsible use
> > of Wikipedia', as just like sex, an abstinence-only approach will not
> > be very successful when it comes to students & Wikipedia. ;)
> >
> > Anyway I figure there may be some people here familiar with this kind
> > of research, although I am not submitting a refereed paper it would
> > still be useful to see what has been done before.
> > I recall the wiki research bibliography - is it still alive? Both
> > <http://bibliography.wikimedia.de/> and
> > <http://tools.wikimedia.de/~voj/bibliography/> are dead links...
> >
> > thanks,
> > Brianna
> >
> > --
> > They've just been waiting in a mountain for the right moment:
> > http://modernthings.org/
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Wiki-research-l mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
> >
>

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Re: Speaking on Wikipedia in/and schools

Cormac Lawler
In reply to this post by Brianna Laugher
Great that you're thinking of doing this, Brianna - and thanks so much to Andrea, who's given me a few more references to follow up on. :-) I'd also add to the list a piece by Doug Achterman <http://news.ala.org/ala/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/kqweb/kqarchives/v33/335achterman.cfm> about the need for library and teaching staff to coordinate activities around information retrieval in general, including on Wikipedia.

But yes, Andrea's right - this literature points to the fact that much more work is needed both in doing research, and in educating both students and educators about the values and pitfalls of using Wikipedia. I'm doing a class next week on educational implications of wikis/Wikipedia - and part of that is to give a look at what happens "inside Wikipedia". You can find this at: <http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Inside_Wikipedia> - please go edit/comment/fork as you see fit. (Actually, Andrea, I've already put your abstract in the references section - let me know if I should remove/replace it.. :-))

Brianna, as to the wiki research bibliography, I don't know what's happened - it might be worth emailing Jakob Voss and/or Patrick Danowski about it (I don't know if either are reading this list these days)...

Cormac




On Feb 19, 2008 5:26 AM, Brianna Laugher <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello all,

I am thinking to make a submission to a "computers in education"
conference, either a non-refereed paper or a "workshop". The audience
will be "teachers and teacher educators". Around 600 people will
attend. The conference is held every two years.
One of the conference themes is "E-learning including information
literacy, Web 2.0 and school libraries".
At first I thought to do a workshop, but their computer labs have only
15-20 computers, which seems very limited to me. So then it seems like
a non-refereed paper is best.

I think a good topic might be '"Safe wiki": Teaching responsible use
of Wikipedia', as just like sex, an abstinence-only approach will not
be very successful when it comes to students & Wikipedia. ;)

Anyway I figure there may be some people here familiar with this kind
of research, although I am not submitting a refereed paper it would
still be useful to see what has been done before.
I recall the wiki research bibliography - is it still alive? Both
<http://bibliography.wikimedia.de/> and
<http://tools.wikimedia.de/~voj/bibliography/> are dead links...

thanks,
Brianna

--
They've just been waiting in a mountain for the right moment:
http://modernthings.org/

_______________________________________________
Wiki-research-l mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l


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Re: Speaking on Wikipedia in/and schools

Brianna Laugher
In reply to this post by Andrea Forte
On 19/02/2008, Andrea Forte <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Also important to make clear: Wikipedia != wiki. I think it is
> particularly important for educators to understand wiki is a tool that
> supports collaborative writing. Some teachers use wiki to support
> student writing activities in software like moodle or externally
> hosted sites and already understand this distinction, but you'd be
> surprised how many people appreciate even this basic information. It
> helps in understanding what Wikipedia is and how it works.

Yes... a separate presentation could definitely be "wikis & the
classroom". But I feel less qualified to talk on that topic, compared
to Wikipedia specifically. But I will make sure to make that point,
that there are many ways of using a wiki besides Wikipedia.

Thanks for the many links and references, I will dig into them soon.

cheers,
Brianna

--
They've just been waiting in a mountain for the right moment:
http://modernthings.org/

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Re: Speaking on Wikipedia in/and schools

Brianna Laugher
In reply to this post by Cormac Lawler
On 20/02/2008, Cormac Lawler <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm doing a
> class next week on educational implications of wikis/Wikipedia - and part of
> that is to give a look at what happens "inside Wikipedia". You can find this
> at: <http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Inside_Wikipedia> -
> please go edit/comment/fork as you see fit.

I gave a talk at a Linux conference a couple of weeks ago that you may
find useful. The aim was to demystify Wikipedia bureaucracy for those
who are comfortable using it but may run into common problems when
trying to edit. I talked about two common areas for trouble, article
deletion and dispute resolution.

Slides:
<http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Who%27s_Behind_Wikipedia%3F_slides_Brianna_Laugher.pdf>

Afterwards I spoke to a journo who more or less turned it into an article:
<http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;1866322157;pp;1;fp;4194304;fpid;1>

Possibly useful diagram (this is supposed to be on slide 4, it doesn't
always show up...)
<http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:English_Wikipedia_user_access_levels_diagram.svg>

My talk was videoed but unfortunately that did not surface yet :(

Anyway I think this talk assumes too much for me to give it to an
audience of teachers. At one interview I gave I found people did not
know about the history tab, and the ability to view each previous
revision. So I will put more emphasis on those things for a teacher
audience, compared to a Linux tech audience.

cheers,
Brianna

--
They've just been waiting in a mountain for the right moment:
http://modernthings.org/

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Re: Speaking on Wikipedia in/and schools

Andrea Forte
I'm sure the majority of people don't know about the history tab...
I've talked to educators and students within the past year who still
didn't know about the *edit* tab. It's always surprising to me that
wikis are still very new to most people. I tend to forget. :) Of
course, at a computers in ed conference I'm sure you are more likely
to run into people who have experience with wiki. (Unless they are
there to get up to speed... sometimes conferences provide teachers
with professional ed credit--I've had a couple of sessions like that
where my audience was getting credit for attending my talk and then
you get a wide range of backgrounds because many of them are there out
of curiosity).

So I was really not kidding when I said that explaining what wiki is
can be extremely helpful. :) My point was not so much about using wiki
in the classroom, but about the diverse levels of experience different
teachers have with wiki.

Andrea


On Feb 19, 2008 7:38 PM, Brianna Laugher <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 20/02/2008, Cormac Lawler <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I'm doing a
> > class next week on educational implications of wikis/Wikipedia - and part of
> > that is to give a look at what happens "inside Wikipedia". You can find this
> > at: <http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Inside_Wikipedia> -
> > please go edit/comment/fork as you see fit.
>
> I gave a talk at a Linux conference a couple of weeks ago that you may
> find useful. The aim was to demystify Wikipedia bureaucracy for those
> who are comfortable using it but may run into common problems when
> trying to edit. I talked about two common areas for trouble, article
> deletion and dispute resolution.
>
> Slides:
> <http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Who%27s_Behind_Wikipedia%3F_slides_Brianna_Laugher.pdf>
>
> Afterwards I spoke to a journo who more or less turned it into an article:
> <http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;1866322157;pp;1;fp;4194304;fpid;1>
>
> Possibly useful diagram (this is supposed to be on slide 4, it doesn't
> always show up...)
> <http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:English_Wikipedia_user_access_levels_diagram.svg>
>
> My talk was videoed but unfortunately that did not surface yet :(
>
> Anyway I think this talk assumes too much for me to give it to an
> audience of teachers. At one interview I gave I found people did not
> know about the history tab, and the ability to view each previous
> revision. So I will put more emphasis on those things for a teacher
> audience, compared to a Linux tech audience.
>
> cheers,
>
> Brianna
>
> --
> They've just been waiting in a mountain for the right moment:
> http://modernthings.org/
>
> _______________________________________________
> Wiki-research-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wiki-research-l
>

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Re: Speaking on Wikipedia in/and schools

Cormac Lawler
In reply to this post by Brianna Laugher

On Feb 20, 2008 12:38 AM, Brianna Laugher <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 20/02/2008, Cormac Lawler <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm doing a
> class next week on educational implications of wikis/Wikipedia - and part of
> that is to give a look at what happens "inside Wikipedia". You can find this
> at: <http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Inside_Wikipedia> -
> please go edit/comment/fork as you see fit.

I gave a talk at a Linux conference a couple of weeks ago that you may
find useful. The aim was to demystify Wikipedia bureaucracy for those
who are comfortable using it but may run into common problems when
trying to edit. I talked about two common areas for trouble, article
deletion and dispute resolution.

Slides:
<http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Who%27s_Behind_Wikipedia%3F_slides_Brianna_Laugher.pdf>

Afterwards I spoke to a journo who more or less turned it into an article:
<http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;1866322157;pp;1;fp;4194304;fpid;1>

Possibly useful diagram (this is supposed to be on slide 4, it doesn't
always show up...)
<http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:English_Wikipedia_user_access_levels_diagram.svg>

My talk was videoed but unfortunately that did not surface yet :(

Anyway I think this talk assumes too much for me to give it to an
audience of teachers. At one interview I gave I found people did not
know about the history tab, and the ability to view each previous
revision. So I will put more emphasis on those things for a teacher
audience, compared to a Linux tech audience.
 

Thanks for this Brianna - nice slides! But yes, you're right that this assumes *way* more info than teachers normally want. People usually want to see how the community works to build something useful - so basic things like history, recent changes, watchlists, talk pages are essential. Oh yes, and the edit button. :-) People want to see how vandalism and bias are dealt with. What kinds of peer review mechanisms are in place (or in planning). Etc etc. These are the basics in "Wikipedia literacy" - and we clearly still have a lot more work to do to educate educators and students about these. But then, the vulnerable features of Wikipedia are its great educational opportunities - to help people think critically about where information comes from (and not simply translate that into "Wikipedia can't be trusted, but the Guardian can"). I loved the quote from Jenkins in the article Andrea linked to: "Just as young people coming of age in a hunting based culture learn by playing with bows and arrows, young people coming of age in an information society learn by playing with information." This for me underlines that an "abstinence only" attitude to Wikipedia is naive in the extreme.

Cormac

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Re: Speaking on Wikipedia in/and schools

Phoebe Ayers-2
In reply to this post by Andrea Forte
On Feb 19, 2008 6:41 PM, Andrea Forte <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I'm sure the majority of people don't know about the history tab...
> I've talked to educators and students within the past year who still
> didn't know about the *edit* tab. It's always surprising to me that
> wikis are still very new to most people. I tend to forget. :)

No kidding. I talked to a group of telecom professionals last night
about Wikipedia and half of *them* didn't know about the edit tab. Of
all the people you would expect....

I think it's always useful to at least ask about people's familiarity
with the site, and if they have ever edited. A lot of the time people
will have heard of wikipedia -- or heard about the controversies --
and may even know it's the "free encyclopedia anyone can edit" -- but
really nothing beyond that. (You mean *anyone*? Really?) Sometimes
people *assume* they know a lot more than they actually do because
they've been reading news stories.

I wonder what things will look like a few years from now -- if WP will
become something that most people know how works.
-- phoebe

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