Where do our readers come from?

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Where do our readers come from?

erikzachte
Today I released 4 new reports, which all focus on:

Where do our readers come from?

 

 <http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j> http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j

 

Cheers, Erik Zachte

 

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Teun Spaans
Hi Erik,

thank you. Very nice.
One suggestion: for trends, i would expect a bar indicating upward or
downward trend, not a percentage bar.

live long and prosper
teun

On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 5:27 AM, Erik Zachte <[hidden email]>wrote:

> Today I released 4 new reports, which all focus on:
>
> Where do our readers come from?
>
>
>
>  <http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j> http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j
>
>
>
> Cheers, Erik Zachte
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> foundation-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> Unsubscribe: https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/foundation-l
>
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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Nikola Smolenski-2
In reply to this post by erikzachte
Erik Zachte wrote:
> Today I released 4 new reports, which all focus on:
>
> Where do our readers come from?
>
>  <http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j> http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j

Excellent and extremely useful! A big thank you! :)

A few questions:

Could we get this for other projects?

At Wikipedia Page Views Per Country - Overview, could you in future
include number of Internet users (f.e. from
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_number_of_Internet_users 
) and number of views per Internet user? IMO, this is more useful than
population and could identify countries where Wikipedia should be
"advertised".

At pages Wikipedia Page Views By Country - Breakdown and Wikipedia Page
Views By Country - Trends, could you include more languages (ideally all
languages)? Perhaps by making a separate page for every country? For
example, I'd like to know data for all minority languages of Serbia.

It would also be interesting to somehow show this data together with
size of the Wikipedia and number of language speakers per country but I
don't see how exactly (and I don't know how to find the number of
language speakers).

Perhaps I will do some of this manually, but just this time! :)

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

M. Williamson
Ethnologue has numbers for all languages although their information is often
outdated or not 100% accurate, it is sufficient if you're doing a list with
many languages.


On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 1:24 AM, Nikola Smolenski <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Erik Zachte wrote:
> > Today I released 4 new reports, which all focus on:
> >
> > Where do our readers come from?
> >
> >  <http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j> http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j
>
> Excellent and extremely useful! A big thank you! :)
>
> A few questions:
>
> Could we get this for other projects?
>
> At Wikipedia Page Views Per Country - Overview, could you in future
> include number of Internet users (f.e. from
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_number_of_Internet_users
> ) and number of views per Internet user? IMO, this is more useful than
> population and could identify countries where Wikipedia should be
> "advertised".
>
> At pages Wikipedia Page Views By Country - Breakdown and Wikipedia Page
> Views By Country - Trends, could you include more languages (ideally all
> languages)? Perhaps by making a separate page for every country? For
> example, I'd like to know data for all minority languages of Serbia.
>
> It would also be interesting to somehow show this data together with
> size of the Wikipedia and number of language speakers per country but I
> don't see how exactly (and I don't know how to find the number of
> language speakers).
>
> Perhaps I will do some of this manually, but just this time! :)
>
> _______________________________________________
> foundation-l mailing list
> [hidden email]
> Unsubscribe: https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/foundation-l
>
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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Nikola Smolenski-2
In reply to this post by erikzachte
Erik Zachte wrote:
> Today I released 4 new reports, which all focus on:
>
> Where do our readers come from?
>
>  <http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j> http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j

Except for Australia-Japanese, there is also this:

Sierra Leone (0.0007% share of global total)
Russian Wp 44.9%
English Wp 43.7%
Portal 8.4%
Slovene Wp 1.1%
Other 1.9%

Why would Russian Wikipedia have so many visits from Sierra Leone?

As a sidenote, there is also this:

Suriname (0.003% share of global total)
English Wp 62.5%
Dutch Wp 28.2%
Portal 4.1%
Serbian Wp 1.5%
Afrikaans Wp 1.4%
Other 2.3%

It is obvious why is Slovene Wikipedia highly visited in Sierra Leone,
and Serbian in Suriname; URLs do matter :)

(Although, I don't understand why so much. I would expect this
distribution by visitors, perhaps, but not by visits.)

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Andre Engels
In reply to this post by erikzachte
On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 5:27 AM, Erik Zachte <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Today I released 4 new reports, which all focus on:
>
> Where do our readers come from?
>
>
>
>  <http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j> http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j

Going through the countries, another remarkable result in my opinion
is the Ukraine - Ukrainian is not a small language by any means, yet
Wikipedia visitors tend to be drawn to the Russian Wikipedia instead.

Also, the Q3-Q4 comparison for most countries shows a shift from
English to the 'vernacular'. Do you have data on this from a longer
period of time? That is, is this part of an ongoing shift, or is it a
seasonal effect (perhaps having to do with Q3 containing the school
holidays in most countries?

To quantify this, I have taken the 50 largest countries, excluding
languages where English is the main language (United States, United
Kingdom, Canada, Australia, India, Philippines, Singapore, Ireland,
New Zealand, South Africa). For all countries I have compared the
percentage going to the main language Wikipedia and those going to the
English Wikipedia (in the Ukrainian case: the Russian Wikipedia), and
also the 'swing' (in the way the term is used in UK politics, see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swing_%28United_Kingdom%29) from English
to the local language (or in the reverse direction, if it is
negative). For countries such as Spain and Belgium which have more
than one local language, the similar data with all local languages are
also given.

Japan: Japanese 92.2% over English (swing -0.4%)
Germany: German 72.2% over English (swing 1.5%)
France: French 67.5% over English (swing 4.1%)
Poland: Polish 71.5% over English (swing 4.0%)
Italy: Italian 71.5% over English (swing 4.7%)
Mexico: Spanish 71.5% over English (swing 3.4%)
Brazil: Portuguese 67.7% over English (swing 1.1%)
Spain: Spanish 60.3% over English (swing 7.0%) - vernaculars 64.4%
over English (swing 8.6%)
Netherlands: Dutch 10.4% over English (swing 6.6%)
Russia: Russian 70.2% over English (swing 4.9%)
Sweden: Swedish 13.8% over English (swing 8.1%)
Switzerland: German 36.6% over English (swing 2.1%) - vernaculars
55.0% over English (swing 2.7%)
Austria: German 65.1% over English (swing -1.1%)
Finland: Finnish 24.7% over English (swing 2.2%) - vernaculars 26.8%
over English (swing 2.8%)
China: Chinese 4.8% over English (swing -7.3%)
Turkey: Turkish 48.7% over English (swing 11.7%)
Belgium: Dutch 9.5% over English (swing 9.2%) - vernaculars 40.1% over
English (swing 9.6%)
Argentina: Spanish 66.2% over English (swing 1.2%)
Norway: Norwegian (Bokmal) 0.9% UNDER English (swing 14.4%) -
vernaculars 0.1% over English (swing 14.5%)
Colombia: Spanish 56.3% over English (swing -3.8%)
Czech Republic: Czech 44.3% over English (swing 10.2%)
Hong Kong: Chinese equal to English (swing 1.0%) - vernaculars 1.4%
over English (swing 1.2%)
Taiwan: Chinese 45.5% over English (swing 3.7%) - vernaculars 45.7%
over English (swing 3.7%)
Chile: Spanish 60.6% over English (swing -2.0%)
Israel: Hebrew 10.9% over English (swing 3.9%) - vernaculars 12.8%
over English (swing 3.9%)
Indonesia: Indonesian 10.2% over English (swing 8.5%) - vernaculars
11.3% over English (swing 8.4%)
Portugal: Portuguese 11.9% over English (swing 2.2%)
South Korea: Korean 2.7% over English (swing 12.8%)
Malaysia: Malay 74.5% UNDER English (swing -1.0%)
Peru: Spanish 74.5% over English (swing 2.1%)
Venezuela: Spanish 77.5% over English (swing 11.1%)
Ukraine: Ukrainian 56.6% UNDER RUSSIAN (swing 4.4%)
Romania: Romanian 21.7% UNDER English (swing 12.6%) - vernaculars
18.5% UNDER English (swing 13.4%)
Thailand: Thai 18.9% over English (swing -3.5%)
Denmark: Danish 12.3% UNDER English (swing 10.7%)
Hungary: Hungarian 23.8% over English (swing 6.1%)
Uruguay: Spanish 72.4% over English (swing 1.1%)
Vietnam: Vietnamese 31.0% over English (swing 8.8%)
Greece: Greek 42.1% UNDER English (swing 9.0%)
Bulgaria: Bulgarian 1.4% over English (swing 8.9%)
United Arab Emirates: Arabic 66.8% UNDER English (swing 5.4%)
Egypt: Arabic 18.5% UNDER English (swing 11.3%)
Lithuania: Lithuanian 9.3% UNDER English (swing -6.4%) - vernaculars
9.3% under English (swing -6.6%)
Iran: Persian 0.6% UNDER English (swing 0.5%)

--
André Engels, [hidden email]

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Marco Chiesa
On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 10:40 AM, Andre Engels <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> To quantify this, I have taken the 50 largest countries, excluding
> languages where English is the main language (United States, United
> Kingdom, Canada, Australia, India, Philippines, Singapore, Ireland,
> New Zealand, South Africa). For all countries I have compared the
> percentage going to the main language Wikipedia and those going to the
> English Wikipedia (in the Ukrainian case: the Russian Wikipedia), and
> also the 'swing' (in the way the term is used in UK politics, see
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swing_%28United_Kingdom%29) from English
> to the local language (or in the reverse direction, if it is
> negative). For countries such as Spain and Belgium which have more
> than one local language, the similar data with all local languages are
> also given.
>

I guess there are also a lot of cases similar to the
Australia/Japanese one of IPs wrongly attributed to one country. For
example, I remember that at least a few years ago (I'm not sure now) a
lot of Italian customers of Tele2 had an IP that was Swedish. Maybe
this is not a big effect given that the Sweden/Swedish relationship
does not differ that much from the other Scandinavian countries.
Cruccone

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Waerth
In reply to this post by Andre Engels
Hmmmm what saddens me is that such a low percentage use the Thai
wikipedia in Thailand instead of the English one.

Having lived in Thailand for over 10 years now my estimation is that
only 10% of the populous would speak English good enough to be able to
read English wikipedia articles at least partially. And this is the part
of the population with the best education. This would mean that
unfortunately Wikipedia doesn't reach the part of the population it is
meant for. The part whom have less access to education.

Waerth/Walter


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Re: Where do our readers come from?

M. Williamson
In reply to this post by Andre Engels
I think there are two main factors influencing this:

# Fluency of the Internet-using population of a country in English. In a
country like Japan, basic English is widespread but real reading
comprehension on the level necessary for reading WP articles is not (as far
as I know at least). Scandinavians, on the other hand, fall at the other end
of the spectrum - according to Wikipedia, 89% of Swedes have a "working
knowledge" of English.

# Quality of the native Wikipedia - if I can speak some English, would it be
worth it to me to look for articles in English instead of my native language
due to greater quality or completeness of the English Wikipedia? If I'm
German, I have much less motivation to read articles in English than if my
native language is Burmese. Of course, this is in purely relative terms -
people in Arab countries preferring English to Arabic for Wikipedia does not
mean that the Arabic Wikipedia is of poor quality, it just means that users
feel that the English Wikipedia is a more reliable or complete resource in
some way.

Mark

On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 2:40 AM, Andre Engels <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 5:27 AM, Erik Zachte <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
> > Today I released 4 new reports, which all focus on:
> >
> > Where do our readers come from?
> >
> >
> >
> >  <http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j> http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j
>
> Going through the countries, another remarkable result in my opinion
> is the Ukraine - Ukrainian is not a small language by any means, yet
> Wikipedia visitors tend to be drawn to the Russian Wikipedia instead.
>
> Also, the Q3-Q4 comparison for most countries shows a shift from
> English to the 'vernacular'. Do you have data on this from a longer
> period of time? That is, is this part of an ongoing shift, or is it a
> seasonal effect (perhaps having to do with Q3 containing the school
> holidays in most countries?
>
> To quantify this, I have taken the 50 largest countries, excluding
> languages where English is the main language (United States, United
> Kingdom, Canada, Australia, India, Philippines, Singapore, Ireland,
> New Zealand, South Africa). For all countries I have compared the
> percentage going to the main language Wikipedia and those going to the
> English Wikipedia (in the Ukrainian case: the Russian Wikipedia), and
> also the 'swing' (in the way the term is used in UK politics, see
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swing_%28United_Kingdom%29) from English
> to the local language (or in the reverse direction, if it is
> negative). For countries such as Spain and Belgium which have more
> than one local language, the similar data with all local languages are
> also given.
>
> Japan: Japanese 92.2% over English (swing -0.4%)
> Germany: German 72.2% over English (swing 1.5%)
> France: French 67.5% over English (swing 4.1%)
> Poland: Polish 71.5% over English (swing 4.0%)
> Italy: Italian 71.5% over English (swing 4.7%)
> Mexico: Spanish 71.5% over English (swing 3.4%)
> Brazil: Portuguese 67.7% over English (swing 1.1%)
> Spain: Spanish 60.3% over English (swing 7.0%) - vernaculars 64.4%
> over English (swing 8.6%)
> Netherlands: Dutch 10.4% over English (swing 6.6%)
> Russia: Russian 70.2% over English (swing 4.9%)
> Sweden: Swedish 13.8% over English (swing 8.1%)
> Switzerland: German 36.6% over English (swing 2.1%) - vernaculars
> 55.0% over English (swing 2.7%)
> Austria: German 65.1% over English (swing -1.1%)
> Finland: Finnish 24.7% over English (swing 2.2%) - vernaculars 26.8%
> over English (swing 2.8%)
> China: Chinese 4.8% over English (swing -7.3%)
> Turkey: Turkish 48.7% over English (swing 11.7%)
> Belgium: Dutch 9.5% over English (swing 9.2%) - vernaculars 40.1% over
> English (swing 9.6%)
> Argentina: Spanish 66.2% over English (swing 1.2%)
> Norway: Norwegian (Bokmal) 0.9% UNDER English (swing 14.4%) -
> vernaculars 0.1% over English (swing 14.5%)
> Colombia: Spanish 56.3% over English (swing -3.8%)
> Czech Republic: Czech 44.3% over English (swing 10.2%)
> Hong Kong: Chinese equal to English (swing 1.0%) - vernaculars 1.4%
> over English (swing 1.2%)
> Taiwan: Chinese 45.5% over English (swing 3.7%) - vernaculars 45.7%
> over English (swing 3.7%)
> Chile: Spanish 60.6% over English (swing -2.0%)
> Israel: Hebrew 10.9% over English (swing 3.9%) - vernaculars 12.8%
> over English (swing 3.9%)
> Indonesia: Indonesian 10.2% over English (swing 8.5%) - vernaculars
> 11.3% over English (swing 8.4%)
> Portugal: Portuguese 11.9% over English (swing 2.2%)
> South Korea: Korean 2.7% over English (swing 12.8%)
> Malaysia: Malay 74.5% UNDER English (swing -1.0%)
> Peru: Spanish 74.5% over English (swing 2.1%)
> Venezuela: Spanish 77.5% over English (swing 11.1%)
> Ukraine: Ukrainian 56.6% UNDER RUSSIAN (swing 4.4%)
> Romania: Romanian 21.7% UNDER English (swing 12.6%) - vernaculars
> 18.5% UNDER English (swing 13.4%)
> Thailand: Thai 18.9% over English (swing -3.5%)
> Denmark: Danish 12.3% UNDER English (swing 10.7%)
> Hungary: Hungarian 23.8% over English (swing 6.1%)
> Uruguay: Spanish 72.4% over English (swing 1.1%)
> Vietnam: Vietnamese 31.0% over English (swing 8.8%)
> Greece: Greek 42.1% UNDER English (swing 9.0%)
> Bulgaria: Bulgarian 1.4% over English (swing 8.9%)
> United Arab Emirates: Arabic 66.8% UNDER English (swing 5.4%)
> Egypt: Arabic 18.5% UNDER English (swing 11.3%)
> Lithuania: Lithuanian 9.3% UNDER English (swing -6.4%) - vernaculars
> 9.3% under English (swing -6.6%)
> Iran: Persian 0.6% UNDER English (swing 0.5%)
>
> --
> André Engels, [hidden email]
>
> _______________________________________________
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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Ziko van Dijk
Hello,
Thank you for the numbers, Erik!
I wonder why 40 % of the visitors of ksh.WP (the dialect of Cologne) are
from Japan. And why 25 % of the visitors of eu.WP (Basque) are from Poland?
Kind regards
Ziko




2010/1/14 Mark Williamson <[hidden email]>

> I think there are two main factors influencing this:
>
> # Fluency of the Internet-using population of a country in English. In a
> country like Japan, basic English is widespread but real reading
> comprehension on the level necessary for reading WP articles is not (as far
> as I know at least). Scandinavians, on the other hand, fall at the other
> end
> of the spectrum - according to Wikipedia, 89% of Swedes have a "working
> knowledge" of English.
>
> # Quality of the native Wikipedia - if I can speak some English, would it
> be
> worth it to me to look for articles in English instead of my native
> language
> due to greater quality or completeness of the English Wikipedia? If I'm
> German, I have much less motivation to read articles in English than if my
> native language is Burmese. Of course, this is in purely relative terms -
> people in Arab countries preferring English to Arabic for Wikipedia does
> not
> mean that the Arabic Wikipedia is of poor quality, it just means that users
> feel that the English Wikipedia is a more reliable or complete resource in
> some way.
>
> Mark
>
> On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 2:40 AM, Andre Engels <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 5:27 AM, Erik Zachte <[hidden email]>
> > wrote:
> > > Today I released 4 new reports, which all focus on:
> > >
> > > Where do our readers come from?
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >  <http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j> http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j
> >
> > Going through the countries, another remarkable result in my opinion
> > is the Ukraine - Ukrainian is not a small language by any means, yet
> > Wikipedia visitors tend to be drawn to the Russian Wikipedia instead.
> >
> > Also, the Q3-Q4 comparison for most countries shows a shift from
> > English to the 'vernacular'. Do you have data on this from a longer
> > period of time? That is, is this part of an ongoing shift, or is it a
> > seasonal effect (perhaps having to do with Q3 containing the school
> > holidays in most countries?
> >
> > To quantify this, I have taken the 50 largest countries, excluding
> > languages where English is the main language (United States, United
> > Kingdom, Canada, Australia, India, Philippines, Singapore, Ireland,
> > New Zealand, South Africa). For all countries I have compared the
> > percentage going to the main language Wikipedia and those going to the
> > English Wikipedia (in the Ukrainian case: the Russian Wikipedia), and
> > also the 'swing' (in the way the term is used in UK politics, see
> > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swing_%28United_Kingdom%29) from English
> > to the local language (or in the reverse direction, if it is
> > negative). For countries such as Spain and Belgium which have more
> > than one local language, the similar data with all local languages are
> > also given.
> >
> > Japan: Japanese 92.2% over English (swing -0.4%)
> > Germany: German 72.2% over English (swing 1.5%)
> > France: French 67.5% over English (swing 4.1%)
> > Poland: Polish 71.5% over English (swing 4.0%)
> > Italy: Italian 71.5% over English (swing 4.7%)
> > Mexico: Spanish 71.5% over English (swing 3.4%)
> > Brazil: Portuguese 67.7% over English (swing 1.1%)
> > Spain: Spanish 60.3% over English (swing 7.0%) - vernaculars 64.4%
> > over English (swing 8.6%)
> > Netherlands: Dutch 10.4% over English (swing 6.6%)
> > Russia: Russian 70.2% over English (swing 4.9%)
> > Sweden: Swedish 13.8% over English (swing 8.1%)
> > Switzerland: German 36.6% over English (swing 2.1%) - vernaculars
> > 55.0% over English (swing 2.7%)
> > Austria: German 65.1% over English (swing -1.1%)
> > Finland: Finnish 24.7% over English (swing 2.2%) - vernaculars 26.8%
> > over English (swing 2.8%)
> > China: Chinese 4.8% over English (swing -7.3%)
> > Turkey: Turkish 48.7% over English (swing 11.7%)
> > Belgium: Dutch 9.5% over English (swing 9.2%) - vernaculars 40.1% over
> > English (swing 9.6%)
> > Argentina: Spanish 66.2% over English (swing 1.2%)
> > Norway: Norwegian (Bokmal) 0.9% UNDER English (swing 14.4%) -
> > vernaculars 0.1% over English (swing 14.5%)
> > Colombia: Spanish 56.3% over English (swing -3.8%)
> > Czech Republic: Czech 44.3% over English (swing 10.2%)
> > Hong Kong: Chinese equal to English (swing 1.0%) - vernaculars 1.4%
> > over English (swing 1.2%)
> > Taiwan: Chinese 45.5% over English (swing 3.7%) - vernaculars 45.7%
> > over English (swing 3.7%)
> > Chile: Spanish 60.6% over English (swing -2.0%)
> > Israel: Hebrew 10.9% over English (swing 3.9%) - vernaculars 12.8%
> > over English (swing 3.9%)
> > Indonesia: Indonesian 10.2% over English (swing 8.5%) - vernaculars
> > 11.3% over English (swing 8.4%)
> > Portugal: Portuguese 11.9% over English (swing 2.2%)
> > South Korea: Korean 2.7% over English (swing 12.8%)
> > Malaysia: Malay 74.5% UNDER English (swing -1.0%)
> > Peru: Spanish 74.5% over English (swing 2.1%)
> > Venezuela: Spanish 77.5% over English (swing 11.1%)
> > Ukraine: Ukrainian 56.6% UNDER RUSSIAN (swing 4.4%)
> > Romania: Romanian 21.7% UNDER English (swing 12.6%) - vernaculars
> > 18.5% UNDER English (swing 13.4%)
> > Thailand: Thai 18.9% over English (swing -3.5%)
> > Denmark: Danish 12.3% UNDER English (swing 10.7%)
> > Hungary: Hungarian 23.8% over English (swing 6.1%)
> > Uruguay: Spanish 72.4% over English (swing 1.1%)
> > Vietnam: Vietnamese 31.0% over English (swing 8.8%)
> > Greece: Greek 42.1% UNDER English (swing 9.0%)
> > Bulgaria: Bulgarian 1.4% over English (swing 8.9%)
> > United Arab Emirates: Arabic 66.8% UNDER English (swing 5.4%)
> > Egypt: Arabic 18.5% UNDER English (swing 11.3%)
> > Lithuania: Lithuanian 9.3% UNDER English (swing -6.4%) - vernaculars
> > 9.3% under English (swing -6.6%)
> > Iran: Persian 0.6% UNDER English (swing 0.5%)
> >
> > --
> > André Engels, [hidden email]
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > foundation-l mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > Unsubscribe: https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/foundation-l
> >
> _______________________________________________
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> Unsubscribe: https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/foundation-l
>



--
Ziko van Dijk
NL-Silvolde
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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Nikola Smolenski-2
Ziko van Dijk wrote:
> Thank you for the numbers, Erik!
> I wonder why 40 % of the visitors of ksh.WP (the dialect of Cologne) are
> from Japan. And why 25 % of the visitors of eu.WP (Basque) are from Poland?

Bots?

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Andre Engels
On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 2:46 PM, Nikola Smolenski <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Ziko van Dijk wrote:
>> Thank you for the numbers, Erik!
>> I wonder why 40 % of the visitors of ksh.WP (the dialect of Cologne) are
>> from Japan. And why 25 % of the visitors of eu.WP (Basque) are from Poland?
>
> Bots?

I think that's a likely explanation in the eu case (unless Erik is
using an algorithm that filters out bots) - I see Poles come up high
in more unexpected small languages (Telugu, Welsh, Alemannic, Frisian,
Cebuan, Norman, Crimean Tartar) - although Basque seems to be the
biggest of the lot.

--
André Engels, [hidden email]

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Nikola Smolenski-2
In reply to this post by erikzachte
Erik Zachte wrote:
> Today I released 4 new reports, which all focus on:
>
> Where do our readers come from?

And, (sorry) one more question: is the first time that such reports are
being released?

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Nikola Smolenski-2
In reply to this post by Andre Engels
Andre Engels wrote:
> Going through the countries, another remarkable result in my opinion
> is the Ukraine - Ukrainian is not a small language by any means, yet
> Wikipedia visitors tend to be drawn to the Russian Wikipedia instead.
>
> Also, the Q3-Q4 comparison for most countries shows a shift from
> English to the 'vernacular'. Do you have data on this from a longer
> period of time? That is, is this part of an ongoing shift, or is it a
> seasonal effect (perhaps having to do with Q3 containing the school
> holidays in most countries?

In Page Views Per Wikipedia Language - Breakdown I also notice something
that should affect chapter relations: there are some Wikipedias which
are read from foreign countries more than from the country of origin
(probably b/c readers from diaspora is richer and has better Internet
access).

For example, Macedonian Wikipedia is read more from Slovenia or Germany
than from Macedonia:

Macedonian (mk) (0.02% share of global total)
Slovenia 30.6%
Germany 23.7%
Macedonia 23.3%

It would therefore make sense for WMDE to try to reach Macedonians
living in Germany, and for future WMMK to help them in doing so.

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Nikola Smolenski-2
Nikola Smolenski wrote:
> In Page Views Per Wikipedia Language - Breakdown I also notice something
> that should affect chapter relations: there are some Wikipedias which

Also, any ideas why is Commons so popular in Spain and Latin America?

Commons (commons) (0.010% share of global total)
Spain 30.0%
United States 29.2%
Brazil 8.5%
Argentina 4.8%
Mexico 3.9%

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Andrew Gray-3
2010/1/14 Nikola Smolenski <[hidden email]>:
> Nikola Smolenski wrote:
>> In Page Views Per Wikipedia Language - Breakdown I also notice something
>> that should affect chapter relations: there are some Wikipedias which
>
> Also, any ideas why is Commons so popular in Spain and Latin America?

Some Wikipedias - the ones which insist on only-free-images - do not
use local uploads at all, and instead direct everyone to Commons. Both
es.wikipedia and pt.wikipedia work this way, so they'll send a lot
more of their users to Commons than a project which uses local image
uploads.

As a result, I suspect you'll find that traffic to Commons increases
proportionately with traffic to Spanish/Portuguese Wikipedia usage.

--
- Andrew Gray
  [hidden email]

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Marcus Buck-2
In reply to this post by Nikola Smolenski-2
Nikola Smolenski hett schreven:

> In Page Views Per Wikipedia Language - Breakdown I also notice something
> that should affect chapter relations: there are some Wikipedias which
> are read from foreign countries more than from the country of origin
> (probably b/c readers from diaspora is richer and has better Internet
> access).
>
> For example, Macedonian Wikipedia is read more from Slovenia or Germany
> than from Macedonia:
>
> Macedonian (mk) (0.02% share of global total)
> Slovenia 30.6%
> Germany 23.7%
> Macedonia 23.3%
>
> It would therefore make sense for WMDE to try to reach Macedonians
> living in Germany, and for future WMMK to help them in doing so.

It would make sense. But at the moment  WMDE is not even actively doing
anything for the _native_ languages of Germany except for German. I
think that would be the first step to do.

Marcus Buck

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Marco Chiesa
On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 3:51 PM, Marcus Buck <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> It would make sense. But at the moment  WMDE is not even actively doing
> anything for the _native_ languages of Germany except for German. I
> think that would be the first step to do.
>

I had a quick look at the native languages of Italy, and I found out
that the percentage of visits from Italy is much smaller for the
regional languages:
Italian: 90.4%
Neapolitan: 45.8%
Tarantino: 43.2%
Emiliano-Romagnolo: 34.5%
Venetian: 33.9%
Lombard: 29.5%
Sicilian: 27.6%
Sardinian: 26.4%
Piedmontese: 24.8%
Friulian: 17.8%
Ligurian: 17.6%

I see a couple of reasons for this difference:
1) Bot visits count proportionally much more in smaller wikis
2) We know that, at least in some of these projects, a lot of
contributors are migrants (even 2nd or 3rd generation) that try to
maintain the regional languages their parents/grandparents used (Italy
had a lot of emigration in the 20th century), so it shouldn't be hard
to imagine that the same happens for the readers. This also partly
explains why Wikimedia Italia has little penetration within this
projects.

It would be interesting to see if the same happens for other
countries, for example Germany
Cruccone

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Nikola Smolenski-2
In reply to this post by Nikola Smolenski-2
Дана Thursday 14 January 2010 09:24:16 Nikola Smolenski написа:
> At Wikipedia Page Views Per Country - Overview, could you in future
> include number of Internet users (f.e. from
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_number_of_Internet_users
> ) and number of views per Internet user? IMO, this is more useful than
> population and could identify countries where Wikipedia should be
> "advertised".

Did it:
http://smolenski.rs/blog/2010/01/wikipedia-page-views-per-country-with-internet-users/

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Re: Where do our readers come from?

Milos Rancic-2
In reply to this post by erikzachte
On Thu, Jan 14, 2010 at 5:27 AM, Erik Zachte <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Today I released 4 new reports, which all focus on:
>
> Where do our readers come from?
>
>
>
>  <http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j> http://tinyurl.com/yhdej3j
>
>
>
> Cheers, Erik Zachte
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> foundation-l mailing list
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> Unsubscribe: https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/foundation-l
>

Erik, may you put somewhere full statistics? Some of the numbers are
going below 0.1% of population, but some of them are not mentioned
even they are larger than 0.5% of population.

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