[Wikimedia Technical Talks] Beyond Wikipedia - Knowledge that even a computer can understand

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[Wikimedia Technical Talks] Beyond Wikipedia - Knowledge that even a computer can understand

Sarah Rodlund
 Hi Everyone,

It's time for Wikimedia Tech Talks 2020 Episode 5! *This talk will take
place next Wednesday on 22 July 2020 at 17:00 UTC.*

*Title:* Beyond Wikipedia - Knowledge that even a computer can understand

*Speaker*: Zbyszko Papierski, Senior Software Engineer
<https://wikimediafoundation.org/profile/zbyszko-papierski/>

*Summary:* Everybody knows what Wikipedia is, right? This magnificent
source of knowledge has been helping countless people with their everyday
lives for nearly two decades. Whether you want to know how to calculate the
circumference of the circle, whether hyenas are pack animals or what really
happened to the Ottoman Empire - Wikipedia’s got your back.

Well, unless you happen to be a computer.

One issue with Wikipedia is that knowledge there isn’t very well
structured. There are links to other pages, sure - but unless you actually
understand the text, you won’t understand what the link actually is. This
is, of course, a field day for AI/ML experts - and there are a lot of
people already scavenging Wikipedia for any meaningful relations.
Fortunately, this is not the only way.

Enter Wikidata - Wikipedia’s younger sister. Wikidata is also a source of
knowledge curated and provided by a community of volunteers but presented
in a relational graph format. Structuring the knowledge has huge
ramifications - it not only makes it easier to digest by software but also
allows you to infer new knowledge.

There are different ways for developers to interact with Wikidata, but
we’ll focus on Wikidata Query Service - a service my team is responsible
for. It provides a queryable interface - using an RDF graph language called
SPARQL (not to be confused with a hundred other things in IT with “spark”
in the name).

Let’s do some discovery!

*The link to the Youtube Livestream can be found here:  *
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNNy8ALGjaE

During the live talk, you are invited to join the discussion on IRC at
#wikimedia-office

You can browse past Tech Talks here:
https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Tech_talks

If you are interested in giving your own tech talk, you can learn more
here:
https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Project:Calendar/How_to_schedule_an_event#Tech_talks

Note: This is a public talk. Feel free to distribute through appropriate
email and social channels!

Kindly,

Sarah R. Rodlund
Senior Technical Writer, Developer Advocacy
<https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Developer_Advocacy>
[hidden email]
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Re: [Wikimedia Technical Talks] Beyond Wikipedia - Knowledge that even a computer can understand

Sarah Rodlund
Hi Everyone,

Just a reminder that this talk will take place in 30 minutes. Hope to see
you there!

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 10:21 AM Sarah R <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Everyone,
>
> It's time for Wikimedia Tech Talks 2020 Episode 5! *This talk will take
> place next Wednesday on 22 July 2020 at 17:00 UTC.*
>
> *Title:* Beyond Wikipedia - Knowledge that even a computer can understand
>
> *Speaker*: Zbyszko Papierski, Senior Software Engineer
> <https://wikimediafoundation.org/profile/zbyszko-papierski/>
>
> *Summary:* Everybody knows what Wikipedia is, right? This magnificent
> source of knowledge has been helping countless people with their everyday
> lives for nearly two decades. Whether you want to know how to calculate the
> circumference of the circle, whether hyenas are pack animals or what really
> happened to the Ottoman Empire - Wikipedia’s got your back.
>
> Well, unless you happen to be a computer.
>
> One issue with Wikipedia is that knowledge there isn’t very well
> structured. There are links to other pages, sure - but unless you actually
> understand the text, you won’t understand what the link actually is. This
> is, of course, a field day for AI/ML experts - and there are a lot of
> people already scavenging Wikipedia for any meaningful relations.
> Fortunately, this is not the only way.
>
> Enter Wikidata - Wikipedia’s younger sister. Wikidata is also a source of
> knowledge curated and provided by a community of volunteers but presented
> in a relational graph format. Structuring the knowledge has huge
> ramifications - it not only makes it easier to digest by software but also
> allows you to infer new knowledge.
>
> There are different ways for developers to interact with Wikidata, but
> we’ll focus on Wikidata Query Service - a service my team is responsible
> for. It provides a queryable interface - using an RDF graph language called
> SPARQL (not to be confused with a hundred other things in IT with “spark”
> in the name).
>
> Let’s do some discovery!
>
> *The link to the Youtube Livestream can be found here:  *
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNNy8ALGjaE
>
> During the live talk, you are invited to join the discussion on IRC at
> #wikimedia-office
>
> You can browse past Tech Talks here:
> https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Tech_talks
>
> If you are interested in giving your own tech talk, you can learn more
> here:
> https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Project:Calendar/How_to_schedule_an_event#Tech_talks
>
> Note: This is a public talk. Feel free to distribute through appropriate
> email and social channels!
>
> Kindly,
>
> Sarah R. Rodlund
> Senior Technical Writer, Developer Advocacy
> <https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Developer_Advocacy>
> [hidden email]
>
_______________________________________________
Wikitech-l mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.wikimedia.org/mailman/listinfo/wikitech-l